Open Lectures

05.11.2019

Public talk by Flo Kasearu

Flo Kasearu (b. 1985) :

I was born in Soviet Union but grew up in Estonia. I studied painting (2004-2008) and photography (2008-2013) at the Estonian Academy of Arts.
In 2006-2007 I was an exchange student at the Rebecca Horn studio at Berlin University of the Arts, where I started doing performance and video art. I work and live in Flo Kasearu House Museum in Tallinn, Estonia.

The nature of my works is seasonal and explorative, in that each project begins as an open-ended game. No favourite theme or a medium. I am interested in grassroots level, private and public space, vertical vs horizontal relationships, monumental vs unstable. I value irony more than aesthetics. So far I have played with private and public space, freedom, economic depression, patriotism and nationalism, domestic violence…

More info: www.flokasearu.eu

The talk is in English and is part of the EKA Contemporary Art MA (MACA) programme’s public lecture series ART TALKS.

Everybody is welcome to join!

Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

Public talk by Flo Kasearu

Tuesday 05 November, 2019

Flo Kasearu (b. 1985) :

I was born in Soviet Union but grew up in Estonia. I studied painting (2004-2008) and photography (2008-2013) at the Estonian Academy of Arts.
In 2006-2007 I was an exchange student at the Rebecca Horn studio at Berlin University of the Arts, where I started doing performance and video art. I work and live in Flo Kasearu House Museum in Tallinn, Estonia.

The nature of my works is seasonal and explorative, in that each project begins as an open-ended game. No favourite theme or a medium. I am interested in grassroots level, private and public space, vertical vs horizontal relationships, monumental vs unstable. I value irony more than aesthetics. So far I have played with private and public space, freedom, economic depression, patriotism and nationalism, domestic violence…

More info: www.flokasearu.eu

The talk is in English and is part of the EKA Contemporary Art MA (MACA) programme’s public lecture series ART TALKS.

Everybody is welcome to join!

Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

07.11.2019

OPEN LECTURE ON ARCHITECTURE: Helena Mattsson

Aesthetics, spatial practices and the 1980s neoliberalization: Open Lecture by Helena Mattsson

The first lecturer of the Open Lecture Series this autumn will be Helena Mattsson, Professor in History and Theory at KTH School of Architecture. In her lecture The Politics of the Archive: Aesthetics, spatial practices and the 1980s neoliberalization, she sets the historical foundation for our neoliberal and capitalist cityscape. Mattsson will be stepping on the stage of the main auditorium of the new EKA building on the 7th of November at 6 pm.

Helena Mattsson is Professor in History and Theory of Architecture at KTH School of Architecture. She is the co-editor of Swedish Modernism: Architecture, Consumption, and the Welfare State and the forthcoming Neoliberalism on the Ground: Architecture and transformation from the 1960s to the present. She is a member of the editorial board of Journal of Architecture. Her research deals with the 20th century theory on welfare state architecture and contemporary architectural history with a special focus on the interdependency between politics, economy and spatial organizations. Another focus for the research is methods of historiography, and investigations into participatory history writing.

Today’s social and political landscape of the welfare state is in a period of radical transformation, a process often labeled as neoliberalization. The role architecture and spatial practices play in this landscape have radically changed, with the separation between spatial dimensions and the administrative state apparatus. This shift calls for new conceptualizations of architecture as a discipline and how it operates. Her lecture discusses the contemporary architectural history of neoliberalization and revisits the archives of the emerging constellations of spatial practices and politics in the 1980s.

The Faculty of Architecture of the Estonian Academy of Arts has curated the Open Lectures on Architecture series since 2012 – each year, a dozen architects, urbanists, both practicing as well as academics, introduce their work and field of research to the audience in Tallinn. All lectures are in English, free and open to everyone.

The series is funded by the Estonian Cultural Endowment.

Curators: Sille Pihlak, Johan Tali

www.avatudloengud.ee 
www.facebook.com/EKAarhitektuur/ 

Posted by Kadi Karine — Permalink

OPEN LECTURE ON ARCHITECTURE: Helena Mattsson

Thursday 07 November, 2019

Aesthetics, spatial practices and the 1980s neoliberalization: Open Lecture by Helena Mattsson

The first lecturer of the Open Lecture Series this autumn will be Helena Mattsson, Professor in History and Theory at KTH School of Architecture. In her lecture The Politics of the Archive: Aesthetics, spatial practices and the 1980s neoliberalization, she sets the historical foundation for our neoliberal and capitalist cityscape. Mattsson will be stepping on the stage of the main auditorium of the new EKA building on the 7th of November at 6 pm.

Helena Mattsson is Professor in History and Theory of Architecture at KTH School of Architecture. She is the co-editor of Swedish Modernism: Architecture, Consumption, and the Welfare State and the forthcoming Neoliberalism on the Ground: Architecture and transformation from the 1960s to the present. She is a member of the editorial board of Journal of Architecture. Her research deals with the 20th century theory on welfare state architecture and contemporary architectural history with a special focus on the interdependency between politics, economy and spatial organizations. Another focus for the research is methods of historiography, and investigations into participatory history writing.

Today’s social and political landscape of the welfare state is in a period of radical transformation, a process often labeled as neoliberalization. The role architecture and spatial practices play in this landscape have radically changed, with the separation between spatial dimensions and the administrative state apparatus. This shift calls for new conceptualizations of architecture as a discipline and how it operates. Her lecture discusses the contemporary architectural history of neoliberalization and revisits the archives of the emerging constellations of spatial practices and politics in the 1980s.

The Faculty of Architecture of the Estonian Academy of Arts has curated the Open Lectures on Architecture series since 2012 – each year, a dozen architects, urbanists, both practicing as well as academics, introduce their work and field of research to the audience in Tallinn. All lectures are in English, free and open to everyone.

The series is funded by the Estonian Cultural Endowment.

Curators: Sille Pihlak, Johan Tali

www.avatudloengud.ee 
www.facebook.com/EKAarhitektuur/ 

Posted by Kadi Karine — Permalink

30.10.2019

EKA 105 open lecture: Reinhold Martin

The new honorary doctor of Estonian Academy of Arts, prof Reinhold Martin (Columbia University) will give an open lecture “Order and Disorder: On Knowledge, Society, and Architecture.”

Reinhold Martin about the lecture:
This talk will consider the interplay of order and disorder, mediated by architecture. Order, in the sense we will explore, makes the world knowable and governable, through the suppression, management, or containment of disorder, which includes entropy or breakdown as well as willful disruption. Architecture, as one of many media, rather than simply a representation or an instrument, operates topologically and epistemologically, arranging and rearranging insides and outsides, drawing and redrawing lines. The lines we will consider distribute forms of knowledge, and the things they seek to know and govern, simultaneously joining what they distinguish. To trace this, the talk will sketch one particular genealogical sequence through the design of campuses, both corporate and academic, beginning on the US side of the Cold War. The larger aim will be to rethink the problem of order and disorder at the intersection of knowledge, society, and architecture, with specific reference to the political economy of design as a will-to-order of its own.

Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

EKA 105 open lecture: Reinhold Martin

Wednesday 30 October, 2019

The new honorary doctor of Estonian Academy of Arts, prof Reinhold Martin (Columbia University) will give an open lecture “Order and Disorder: On Knowledge, Society, and Architecture.”

Reinhold Martin about the lecture:
This talk will consider the interplay of order and disorder, mediated by architecture. Order, in the sense we will explore, makes the world knowable and governable, through the suppression, management, or containment of disorder, which includes entropy or breakdown as well as willful disruption. Architecture, as one of many media, rather than simply a representation or an instrument, operates topologically and epistemologically, arranging and rearranging insides and outsides, drawing and redrawing lines. The lines we will consider distribute forms of knowledge, and the things they seek to know and govern, simultaneously joining what they distinguish. To trace this, the talk will sketch one particular genealogical sequence through the design of campuses, both corporate and academic, beginning on the US side of the Cold War. The larger aim will be to rethink the problem of order and disorder at the intersection of knowledge, society, and architecture, with specific reference to the political economy of design as a will-to-order of its own.

Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

30.10.2019

EKA 105 open lecture: Griselda Pollock

The honorary doctor Griselda Pollock will give an open lecture “From Alain Resnais’s Van Gogh (1948) to Julian Schnabel’s At Eternity’s Gate (2018): Why are we still Loving Vincent (2017)?”

Griselda Pollock about the lecture:
“The first exhibition I ever saw, I think, was of the work of Vincent van Gogh in 1961. I forgot about that first encounter until 1990, when, at a conference on the centenary of his death, I delivered a deconstructionist paper tracing the construction of ‘Van Gogh’ over the twentieth century. My research into his exhibition history revealed that the show in Toronto in 1961 was part of a specific post-war series of exhibitions when VG’swork was sent around the world, ensuring this artist’s spectacular place in the twentieth century’s cultural imagination as ‘the modern artist’. I also realized that this buried memory of an exhibition visited in 1961 with my art-loving mother, who died three years later, may have been the unconscious prompt for my choice, in 1972, of Van Gogh as my PhD dissertation topic.

Over my fifty-years, I have struggled against ‘the myth of Van Gogh’ in many publications and exhibition projects. In this lecture, I will return to one of the earliest films made about the artist by French documentarist Alain Resnais in black and white in 1948 and to the animated film Loving Vincent and the American painter Julian Schnabel’s personal homage, At Eternity’s Gate. What are the different concepts of art and artist this mythic ‘Vincent’/’Van Gogh’ has mirrored? What are the art histories I have tried to create to challenge their potency, affect, and dangers? Why does this myth and image persist and entrance?”

Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

EKA 105 open lecture: Griselda Pollock

Wednesday 30 October, 2019

The honorary doctor Griselda Pollock will give an open lecture “From Alain Resnais’s Van Gogh (1948) to Julian Schnabel’s At Eternity’s Gate (2018): Why are we still Loving Vincent (2017)?”

Griselda Pollock about the lecture:
“The first exhibition I ever saw, I think, was of the work of Vincent van Gogh in 1961. I forgot about that first encounter until 1990, when, at a conference on the centenary of his death, I delivered a deconstructionist paper tracing the construction of ‘Van Gogh’ over the twentieth century. My research into his exhibition history revealed that the show in Toronto in 1961 was part of a specific post-war series of exhibitions when VG’swork was sent around the world, ensuring this artist’s spectacular place in the twentieth century’s cultural imagination as ‘the modern artist’. I also realized that this buried memory of an exhibition visited in 1961 with my art-loving mother, who died three years later, may have been the unconscious prompt for my choice, in 1972, of Van Gogh as my PhD dissertation topic.

Over my fifty-years, I have struggled against ‘the myth of Van Gogh’ in many publications and exhibition projects. In this lecture, I will return to one of the earliest films made about the artist by French documentarist Alain Resnais in black and white in 1948 and to the animated film Loving Vincent and the American painter Julian Schnabel’s personal homage, At Eternity’s Gate. What are the different concepts of art and artist this mythic ‘Vincent’/’Van Gogh’ has mirrored? What are the art histories I have tried to create to challenge their potency, affect, and dangers? Why does this myth and image persist and entrance?”

Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

22.10.2019

Arist talk by Anne Pöhlmann

Tuesday, 22nd of October at 17.00 the artist Anne Pöhlmann will hold a public presentation of her artistic practice in room A501 at the Estonian Academy of Arts.

Anne Pöhlmann (b.1978) is a Düsselforf based contemporary artist, who’s work reflects the ever-changing conditions of the medium of digital photography.

She researches, among other things, the influence of software formulating photographic images, as well as the way we see photographs on monitors. The material translation of digital images into photo prints is a conceptual matter in Anne Pöhlmann’s practice. Her photographs range from urban architecture and natural landscapes to portraits and abstract compositions. They manifest as architecture-related installations of posters or banners that she prints on textiles. In these installations, the architectural space functions both as a spatial screen and layout location.

More recently, Pöhlmann prints her photos on various materials, like silk or cotton. The prints are subsequently sewn together with other prints into photo-fabrics and often combined with vintage textiles from the artist collection.

In works such as Japan Room (2019), Anne Pöhlmann presents folded photographs and photo-fabrics as fluid architectural formations, where the printed image merges with its carrier. Parallel Anne Pöhlmann has developed photographic works that represent an artistically subjective approach to the documentation of works of art and exhibition architecture. The artist published the resulting photographic series or sequences in the form of photo essays. In 2012 together with Diango Hernández, she founded the artist platform Lonelyfingers. Her work has received several awards and has been shown internationally in solo and group exhibitions. From 2018 to 2019, she has held a position as a visiting professor for photography at Art Academy (HBK) Braunschweig, Germany. Before that, she worked as a visiting lecturer at Folkwang University of the Arts in Essen, Germany. She regularly participates in workshops, lectures, and conferences at various international institutions.

Anne Pöhlmann was invited to Tallinn on behalf of the Department of Photography of Estonian Academy of Arts. During 21.–25th of October, she is giving a workshop in the Photography Department.

The lecture is in English.

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/681705208987400/
For more info about Anne Pöhlmann: http://www.annepoehlmann.net/

Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

Arist talk by Anne Pöhlmann

Tuesday 22 October, 2019

Tuesday, 22nd of October at 17.00 the artist Anne Pöhlmann will hold a public presentation of her artistic practice in room A501 at the Estonian Academy of Arts.

Anne Pöhlmann (b.1978) is a Düsselforf based contemporary artist, who’s work reflects the ever-changing conditions of the medium of digital photography.

She researches, among other things, the influence of software formulating photographic images, as well as the way we see photographs on monitors. The material translation of digital images into photo prints is a conceptual matter in Anne Pöhlmann’s practice. Her photographs range from urban architecture and natural landscapes to portraits and abstract compositions. They manifest as architecture-related installations of posters or banners that she prints on textiles. In these installations, the architectural space functions both as a spatial screen and layout location.

More recently, Pöhlmann prints her photos on various materials, like silk or cotton. The prints are subsequently sewn together with other prints into photo-fabrics and often combined with vintage textiles from the artist collection.

In works such as Japan Room (2019), Anne Pöhlmann presents folded photographs and photo-fabrics as fluid architectural formations, where the printed image merges with its carrier. Parallel Anne Pöhlmann has developed photographic works that represent an artistically subjective approach to the documentation of works of art and exhibition architecture. The artist published the resulting photographic series or sequences in the form of photo essays. In 2012 together with Diango Hernández, she founded the artist platform Lonelyfingers. Her work has received several awards and has been shown internationally in solo and group exhibitions. From 2018 to 2019, she has held a position as a visiting professor for photography at Art Academy (HBK) Braunschweig, Germany. Before that, she worked as a visiting lecturer at Folkwang University of the Arts in Essen, Germany. She regularly participates in workshops, lectures, and conferences at various international institutions.

Anne Pöhlmann was invited to Tallinn on behalf of the Department of Photography of Estonian Academy of Arts. During 21.–25th of October, she is giving a workshop in the Photography Department.

The lecture is in English.

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/681705208987400/
For more info about Anne Pöhlmann: http://www.annepoehlmann.net/

Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

22.10.2019

Public presentations of the creative practices of Josse Pyl, Eloise Harris ja Jungmyung Lee

Tomorrow, October 22nd at 6PM artists and graphic designers Josse Pyl, Eloise Harris and Jungmyung Lee will hold public presentations at the Department of Graphic Design room C305.

All presentations will be about their practice and projects.

Jungmyung Lee practices intimate relations between type design, typography, visual art, and writings through Jung-Lee Type Foundry (Amsterdam, NL) by exploring the life of typefaces and their emotions. She also publishes Real-Time Realist, which is a unique type specimen that experiments the aforementioned relations based on Wheel of Emotions.
http://jung-lee.nl

Eloise Harris is an independent graphic designer based in Berlin, collaborating with artists and institutions on a range of projects creating visual identities, art directing, designing for print, image making, and she quest teaches graphic design play at UE in Berlin. Before that, Eloise graduated from Werkplaats Typografie in Arnhem and LCC in London.
http://www.eloiseharris.com/

Josse Pyl lives and works in Amsterdam. He was an artist in residence (2017–2018) at the Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten (Amsterdam) and has completed a Master of Visual Arts (2014–2016) at Werkplaats Typografie (Arnhem) and a Master (2013-2014) and Bachelor (2010-2013) of Visual Arts at KASK School of Arts (Ghent). He recently had solo presentations at 019 (Ghent), Annet Gelink Gallery (Amsterdam) and the Brakkegrond (Amsterdam) and participated in group shows at Nest (The Hague), Dash Gallery (Kortrijk), The Belgium Biennial (Ghent) and Ljubljana Biennial of Graphic Arts (Ljubljana).
http://www.jossepyl.com/

Josse Pyl, Eloise Harris and Jungmyung Lee are invited to Tallinn on behalf of the Department of Graphic Design of Estonian Academy of Arts to give workshops at the department October 21 through 25.

Presentations will be in English.

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Public presentations of the creative practices of Josse Pyl, Eloise Harris ja Jungmyung Lee

Tuesday 22 October, 2019

Tomorrow, October 22nd at 6PM artists and graphic designers Josse Pyl, Eloise Harris and Jungmyung Lee will hold public presentations at the Department of Graphic Design room C305.

All presentations will be about their practice and projects.

Jungmyung Lee practices intimate relations between type design, typography, visual art, and writings through Jung-Lee Type Foundry (Amsterdam, NL) by exploring the life of typefaces and their emotions. She also publishes Real-Time Realist, which is a unique type specimen that experiments the aforementioned relations based on Wheel of Emotions.
http://jung-lee.nl

Eloise Harris is an independent graphic designer based in Berlin, collaborating with artists and institutions on a range of projects creating visual identities, art directing, designing for print, image making, and she quest teaches graphic design play at UE in Berlin. Before that, Eloise graduated from Werkplaats Typografie in Arnhem and LCC in London.
http://www.eloiseharris.com/

Josse Pyl lives and works in Amsterdam. He was an artist in residence (2017–2018) at the Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten (Amsterdam) and has completed a Master of Visual Arts (2014–2016) at Werkplaats Typografie (Arnhem) and a Master (2013-2014) and Bachelor (2010-2013) of Visual Arts at KASK School of Arts (Ghent). He recently had solo presentations at 019 (Ghent), Annet Gelink Gallery (Amsterdam) and the Brakkegrond (Amsterdam) and participated in group shows at Nest (The Hague), Dash Gallery (Kortrijk), The Belgium Biennial (Ghent) and Ljubljana Biennial of Graphic Arts (Ljubljana).
http://www.jossepyl.com/

Josse Pyl, Eloise Harris and Jungmyung Lee are invited to Tallinn on behalf of the Department of Graphic Design of Estonian Academy of Arts to give workshops at the department October 21 through 25.

Presentations will be in English.

Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

25.10.2019

Navigating an Age of Uncertainty through Architectural Research

Open Lecture by:
Rolf Hughes, Professor of Artistic Research, Estonian Academy of the Arts/Experimental Architecture Group, Newcastle University

&

Rachel Armstrong, Professor of Experimental Architecture, Experimental Architecture Group, Newcastle University

This lecture describes the framework and strategies for engaging an age of uncertainty through artistic and design-led research. The presentation will ask how we will be inhabiting and making spaces at times of radical change. Hughes and Armstrong will provide examples from architectural research, address the value of creating transdisciplinary networks, the role of the architectural thinker within such networks, and the need to protect the artistic integrity of goal-based research projects.

Rolf Hughes has been at the forefront of developments in artistic research in Scandinavia and Northern Europe from its inception. He is currently Director of Artistic Research for the Experimental Architecture Group at Newcastle University (UK), Visiting Professor for the Estonian Academy of the Arts and the Norwegian Artistic Research Programme. He has supervised and examined PhD dissertations across architecture, art, craft, design, photography and the performing arts since 2000, including for the Bartlett, University of Westminster, Middlesex University, KU Leuven, Royal Institute of Technology, Oslo School of Architecture, Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Stockholm University of the Arts, and elsewhere. He has published widely, and is in demand internationally as an expert on artistic research.

Rachel Armstrong is Professor of Experimental Architecture at the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape, Newcastle University (UK). Her work explores how our buildings can incorporate some of the properties of living systems to become ‘living architectures’. She was coordinator for the FET Open Living Architecture project (April 2016-June 2019) and coordinates the EU Innovation Fund ALICE project. She is a Rising Waters II Fellow with the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation (April-May 2016) and a 2010 Senior TED Fellow. She is also a Member of the Hub for Biotechnology in the Built Environment at Newcastle University and Director and founder of the Experimental Architecture Group (EAG) whose work has been published and exhibited internationally.

Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

Navigating an Age of Uncertainty through Architectural Research

Friday 25 October, 2019

Open Lecture by:
Rolf Hughes, Professor of Artistic Research, Estonian Academy of the Arts/Experimental Architecture Group, Newcastle University

&

Rachel Armstrong, Professor of Experimental Architecture, Experimental Architecture Group, Newcastle University

This lecture describes the framework and strategies for engaging an age of uncertainty through artistic and design-led research. The presentation will ask how we will be inhabiting and making spaces at times of radical change. Hughes and Armstrong will provide examples from architectural research, address the value of creating transdisciplinary networks, the role of the architectural thinker within such networks, and the need to protect the artistic integrity of goal-based research projects.

Rolf Hughes has been at the forefront of developments in artistic research in Scandinavia and Northern Europe from its inception. He is currently Director of Artistic Research for the Experimental Architecture Group at Newcastle University (UK), Visiting Professor for the Estonian Academy of the Arts and the Norwegian Artistic Research Programme. He has supervised and examined PhD dissertations across architecture, art, craft, design, photography and the performing arts since 2000, including for the Bartlett, University of Westminster, Middlesex University, KU Leuven, Royal Institute of Technology, Oslo School of Architecture, Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Stockholm University of the Arts, and elsewhere. He has published widely, and is in demand internationally as an expert on artistic research.

Rachel Armstrong is Professor of Experimental Architecture at the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape, Newcastle University (UK). Her work explores how our buildings can incorporate some of the properties of living systems to become ‘living architectures’. She was coordinator for the FET Open Living Architecture project (April 2016-June 2019) and coordinates the EU Innovation Fund ALICE project. She is a Rising Waters II Fellow with the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation (April-May 2016) and a 2010 Senior TED Fellow. She is also a Member of the Hub for Biotechnology in the Built Environment at Newcastle University and Director and founder of the Experimental Architecture Group (EAG) whose work has been published and exhibited internationally.

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16.10.2019

Open Lecture: multimedia artist Tyler Tekatch

On this Wednesday, 16th October at 4 PM in room A501 takes place the 7th Open Seminar of the Faculty of Fine Arts. This time we are visited by Canadian multimedia artist Tyler Tekatch. The seminar will be held in English.

Hamilton-based artist Tyler Tekatch creates work in film, video and installation that explores perception and the religious imagination. Influenced by Canadian filmmaker/artists such as Michael Snow, Joyce Wieland, Jack Chambers and Bruce Elder, Tekatch takes an experimental approach to media. He has expanded his practice to combine film and video with emerging technologies, such as projection mapping and interactivity. He has held two solo exhibitions at the Art Gallery of Hamilton and the Ottawa Art Gallery, and has screened films at the TIFF Bell Lightbox, the Canadian National Film Board, and internationally.

https://tytekatch.com

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Open Lecture: multimedia artist Tyler Tekatch

Wednesday 16 October, 2019

On this Wednesday, 16th October at 4 PM in room A501 takes place the 7th Open Seminar of the Faculty of Fine Arts. This time we are visited by Canadian multimedia artist Tyler Tekatch. The seminar will be held in English.

Hamilton-based artist Tyler Tekatch creates work in film, video and installation that explores perception and the religious imagination. Influenced by Canadian filmmaker/artists such as Michael Snow, Joyce Wieland, Jack Chambers and Bruce Elder, Tekatch takes an experimental approach to media. He has expanded his practice to combine film and video with emerging technologies, such as projection mapping and interactivity. He has held two solo exhibitions at the Art Gallery of Hamilton and the Ottawa Art Gallery, and has screened films at the TIFF Bell Lightbox, the Canadian National Film Board, and internationally.

https://tytekatch.com

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24.09.2019

EKA open lecture: Post Brothers

Open lecture by Post Brothers on Tuesday, September 24 at 5 pm in room B205
Post Brothers is a critical enterprise that includes Matthew Post, an enthusiast, taxi driver, word processor, and curator often engaged in artist-centered projects and collaborations, or occupying the secondary information surrounding cultural production. In collaboration with the artist Simon Dybbroe Møller Post Brothers has curated the Tallinn’s Photomonth exhibition Mercury currently on view at Tallinn Art Hall. Additionally he has curated exhibitions and presented projects in Poland, Mexico, Canada, Spain, the United States, Portugal, Denmark, Greece, Estonia, Germany, Austria, Lithuania, Italy, Finland, Belgium, Latvia, The Netherlands, and China. From 2016 until the autumn of 2019, he was the curator at Kunstverein München in Munich, Germany. His essays and articles have been published in Annual Magazine, the Baltic Notebooks of Anthony Blunt, Cura, Fillip, Kaleidoscope, Mousse, Nero, Art Papers, Pazmaker, Punkt, and Spike Art Quarterly, as well as in numerous artist publications and exhibition catalogues. He lives in Kolonia Koplany, a village near Bialystok, Poland.
Talk takes place in english and is part of the international Contemporary Art MA programme MACA lecture series ART TALKS.
Everybody is welcome to join!
Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

EKA open lecture: Post Brothers

Tuesday 24 September, 2019

Open lecture by Post Brothers on Tuesday, September 24 at 5 pm in room B205
Post Brothers is a critical enterprise that includes Matthew Post, an enthusiast, taxi driver, word processor, and curator often engaged in artist-centered projects and collaborations, or occupying the secondary information surrounding cultural production. In collaboration with the artist Simon Dybbroe Møller Post Brothers has curated the Tallinn’s Photomonth exhibition Mercury currently on view at Tallinn Art Hall. Additionally he has curated exhibitions and presented projects in Poland, Mexico, Canada, Spain, the United States, Portugal, Denmark, Greece, Estonia, Germany, Austria, Lithuania, Italy, Finland, Belgium, Latvia, The Netherlands, and China. From 2016 until the autumn of 2019, he was the curator at Kunstverein München in Munich, Germany. His essays and articles have been published in Annual Magazine, the Baltic Notebooks of Anthony Blunt, Cura, Fillip, Kaleidoscope, Mousse, Nero, Art Papers, Pazmaker, Punkt, and Spike Art Quarterly, as well as in numerous artist publications and exhibition catalogues. He lives in Kolonia Koplany, a village near Bialystok, Poland.
Talk takes place in english and is part of the international Contemporary Art MA programme MACA lecture series ART TALKS.
Everybody is welcome to join!
Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

09.10.2019

EKA open lecture: Jan van Boeckel “Art and Sustainability Education in an Age of Uncertainty and Climate Fear”

October 9, at 16.00, room A101

Open Lecture by Jan van Boeckel
Art and Sustainability Education in an Age of Uncertainty and Climate Fear

Jan van Boeckel will give a presentation on fostering attention through arts-based open-ended approaches in an age of ecological emergency and radical uncertainty. If we are to respond adequately to the rapid and deep changes taking place in the world in our current times, we may need to envisage a very different type of education. Not one that is predominantly based on knowledge transfer, but a kind of teaching and learning that foregrounds engaging with radical uncertainty. In more open-ended modalities of education, learners tend not to know on forehand what the outcomes and expected deliverables will be. Such approaches may cause a sense of unease because of a presumed lack of control, of missing framing guidelines and clear target objectives. It is exactly in this space of vulnerability that it is essential that learners feel that their educational experience is safely contained and held by teachers and facilitators. A way of achieving this may be through employing arts-based approaches. Through such practices of artful exploring (for example together with a group of students) a sense of excitement, of curiosity and wonder may be prompted.

One of Van Boeckel’s key areas of interest is in educational activity as primarily and fundamentally an open-ended process. The outcome is not given, though the participants follow certain sequential steps which frame the process. Through teaching and hands-on doing, it aims to promote understanding of interconnected systems – both biological and cultural. Van Boeckel contextualizes this form of arts-based environmental education by valuing it as a form of ‘poor pedagogy’, as articulated by Jan Masschelein. Such practice is expressive of a view on education that is not about the transmission of knowledge but rather is a way of attending to things (Tim Ingold). It is also ‘weak pedagogy’, in which is foregrounded what Gert Biesta regards as ‘the educational imperative’: to arouse in another human being the desire to exist as subject, in dialogue with the world. For him this means being ‘in the world without occupying the centre of the world’, trying to exist in dialogue with what and who is other.

Exactly because artistic activities and research, as part of this kind of education, aren’t prima facie linked to urgent themes such as climate change – that they may lend possibilities, affordances, to take up such subjects in new ways. For, on a meta-level, they can also be seen as exercises in facing complexity, uncertainty, not-knowing, and of discovering and forging new relationships between phenomena and processes, in ways that are often far from obvious. Van Boeckel suggests that it is precisely this element of sustainable education (Stephen Sterling) we need, if we are aiming to equip new generations with skills to live in ‘postnormal times.’

Jan van Boeckel is an artist and art educator who has worked for many years on the intersections of art, education and ecology. He was professor in art pedagogy at EKA from 2015 until 2018. Before he was a teacher at the Iceland University of the Arts and other places. In academic year 2018-2019 Jan worked as senior lecturer in art education at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden and as visiting lecturer and teacher on the themes of art, sustainability and climate leadership at the Centre for Environment and Development Studies (CEMUS) in Uppsala, also in Sweden.
More info: www.janvanboeckel.wordpress.com

The lecture is in English, attendance free.

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EKA open lecture: Jan van Boeckel “Art and Sustainability Education in an Age of Uncertainty and Climate Fear”

Wednesday 09 October, 2019

October 9, at 16.00, room A101

Open Lecture by Jan van Boeckel
Art and Sustainability Education in an Age of Uncertainty and Climate Fear

Jan van Boeckel will give a presentation on fostering attention through arts-based open-ended approaches in an age of ecological emergency and radical uncertainty. If we are to respond adequately to the rapid and deep changes taking place in the world in our current times, we may need to envisage a very different type of education. Not one that is predominantly based on knowledge transfer, but a kind of teaching and learning that foregrounds engaging with radical uncertainty. In more open-ended modalities of education, learners tend not to know on forehand what the outcomes and expected deliverables will be. Such approaches may cause a sense of unease because of a presumed lack of control, of missing framing guidelines and clear target objectives. It is exactly in this space of vulnerability that it is essential that learners feel that their educational experience is safely contained and held by teachers and facilitators. A way of achieving this may be through employing arts-based approaches. Through such practices of artful exploring (for example together with a group of students) a sense of excitement, of curiosity and wonder may be prompted.

One of Van Boeckel’s key areas of interest is in educational activity as primarily and fundamentally an open-ended process. The outcome is not given, though the participants follow certain sequential steps which frame the process. Through teaching and hands-on doing, it aims to promote understanding of interconnected systems – both biological and cultural. Van Boeckel contextualizes this form of arts-based environmental education by valuing it as a form of ‘poor pedagogy’, as articulated by Jan Masschelein. Such practice is expressive of a view on education that is not about the transmission of knowledge but rather is a way of attending to things (Tim Ingold). It is also ‘weak pedagogy’, in which is foregrounded what Gert Biesta regards as ‘the educational imperative’: to arouse in another human being the desire to exist as subject, in dialogue with the world. For him this means being ‘in the world without occupying the centre of the world’, trying to exist in dialogue with what and who is other.

Exactly because artistic activities and research, as part of this kind of education, aren’t prima facie linked to urgent themes such as climate change – that they may lend possibilities, affordances, to take up such subjects in new ways. For, on a meta-level, they can also be seen as exercises in facing complexity, uncertainty, not-knowing, and of discovering and forging new relationships between phenomena and processes, in ways that are often far from obvious. Van Boeckel suggests that it is precisely this element of sustainable education (Stephen Sterling) we need, if we are aiming to equip new generations with skills to live in ‘postnormal times.’

Jan van Boeckel is an artist and art educator who has worked for many years on the intersections of art, education and ecology. He was professor in art pedagogy at EKA from 2015 until 2018. Before he was a teacher at the Iceland University of the Arts and other places. In academic year 2018-2019 Jan worked as senior lecturer in art education at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden and as visiting lecturer and teacher on the themes of art, sustainability and climate leadership at the Centre for Environment and Development Studies (CEMUS) in Uppsala, also in Sweden.
More info: www.janvanboeckel.wordpress.com

The lecture is in English, attendance free.

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