Faculty of Architecture

Faculty of Architecture is the focal point of Estonian architectural education
and the most important centre of competence in all the creative disciplines
related to artificial environments, including interior architecture, architecture, landscape design, and urban planning and design. The nucleus of the tuition is comprised of the Architecture and Urban Design as well as Interior Architecture programmes.  The first of these includes contemporary architectural studies, in the best sense of the word, by paying equal attention to actual buildings, spaces between them, and the larger environments where they are located. 

When studying architecture, it is also possible to study landscape architecture as a subsidiary subject. The second programme deals, more precisely, with the scale of human body in the design and production of furniture and interiors. Architecture and interior architecture are very closely related, with significant overlapping and joint projects in one’s academic studies, and later, in one’s professional life. An important aspect of the tuition is the long-term association between spatial and material knowledge of all scales.

Since 2004, Urban Studies programme has been offered at the Master’s level. It is an international English-language curriculum, which, unlike the above, is not studio based education, but deals with research concerning the functioning of modern cities, from the perspective of their users, major participants, decision-makers and planners. Strategies for the future are created, and opportunities sought, for their implementation.

Interior Architecture department also has an international Interior Architecture MA programme with English language curriculum.

 

Open Lecture: ARTEM KITAEV on 14th December

The last lecturer of the Open Lecture Series this autumn semester will be Basel-based architect Artem Kitaev, who will be stepping on the stage of Kanuti Gildi Saal (Pikk 20, Tallinn) on 14th December at 6 pm. Kitaev’s lecture is titled Kosmos / Chaos, it’s in English and free for everyone.

Originating from Moscow, Kitaev is working with a team based now in Moscow, Basel, New York and Bangkok. His architecture office KOSMOS works across typologies and on different scales – from door handles to the city, from earnest architecture to temporary installations. KOSMOS, in their own words, combines art with technology, global experience with respect towards local context and European professionalism with Russian drive.

Kitaev graduated in Moscow, started in Moscow office Meganom, then moved to Switzerland where he worked for 4 years for Herzog de Meuron, then focused on KOSMOS only. In parallel with architectural design, KOSMOS is involved in teaching, working on researches, industrial design and publications. First project built by KOSMOS team is Temporary museum for Center of Contemporary Culture Garage in Moscow.

More about Kitaev and KOSMOS: https://k-s-m-s.com/office

The Open Lecture Series brings to Tallinn a number of exciting architects, urban planners, academics from across the world. All Open Lectures are free of charge, in English, take place every fortnight, and are open to everyone – for both students and professionals of the field, general audience and students considering architecture for their further studies.

The architecture and urban planning department of the Estonian Academy of Arts has been curating the Open Lectures on Architecture series since 2012 – each year, a dozen architects, urbanists, both practicing as well as academics, introduce their work and field of research to the audience in Tallinn. All lectures are in English, free and open to all interested, drawing an audience of students as well as professionals and academics from the fields of architecture, design, engineering but also fine arts. The series is funded by the Estonian Cultural Endowment.

Curators: Sille Pihlak, Siim Tuksam
www.avatudloengud.ee
https://www.facebook.com/EKAarhitektuur/

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Launch of the publication “What to do together?” by Rundum artist-run space

 

 

Launch of the publication “What to do together?” by Rundum artist-run space

Thu 07.12.2017 at 7 pm, ARS building  (Pärnu mnt 154, room 111)

 

What if

The freedom to choose, to say no.

Deliberately disorganise. Develop bad habits. Be ungrateful.

We are flexible only when moving on familiar territory and terms.

What if it were very simple. We just haven’t tried it this way.

The hunger for new solutions.

Falling in love.

To move further from knowing or contemplating what a self-organised initiative is and to become something else on the way.

How not to be just active, but active in a meaningful way.

It is not only something that the authority is forbidding, which stops the development and transformation of oneself, but the learned habits, which tend to normalize certain behaviour. To realise one’s capabilities and freedoms and to realise that there exist situations where a certain degree of autonomy can be reached and practiced.

On Thursday, December 7th at 7 p.m. Rundum artist-run space launches the publication “What to do together?” in the ARS building (Pärnu mnt 154, room 111).

Presenting various thinkers, creatives, approaches and experiences, the open-ended publication brings together visual and textual essays from both within and outside of Rundum artist-run space, which all serve to conceptualise the self-organisation of artists. Our aim is to redefine how to do things (together) without adhering to presupposed or habitual norms.

Compiled by Rundum

(Mari-Leen Kiipli, Kulla Laas, Aap Tepper, Mari Volens, Kristina Õllek)

Authors: Alberto García del Castillo, Barnaby Drabble, Amaranta Heredia Jaén, Mari-Leen Kiipli, Kulla Laas, Aap Tepper, Kirill Tulin, Kert Viiart, Mari Volens, Kristina Õllek

Translation: Tõnis Jürgens, Anna-Liisa Laarits

Proofreading: Tõnis Jürgens, Michael Haagensen

Graphic design: Studio Le60 (Kert Viiart)

Thanks to Ivar Tõnisson (Raam), Kersti Sülla (Pabrik), Indrek Köster (EKL), Krõõt Juurak, Michelangelo Miccolis, Adriano Wilfert Jensen

Supported by Estonia 100 art programme “One Hundred Art Landscapes”, Center for Contemporary Arts Estonia, the Cultural Endowment of Estonia and the Estonian Artist’s Association.

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The first year master students of painting department in Estonian Academy of Arts invite you to their end of semester exhibition

 

It takes place on the 29th of November in the second tunnel of the historical ammunition storage in Astangu and lasts for only one night!

The exhibited works are site-specific and deal with the problematics related to the location. What kind of meaning does a former ammunition storage with its non-functional existence possess regarding the city? What symbols does it hold, what connections does it awake? How can an artist use extreme conditions and make them work for his or her creation?
Tunnel as a storage, tunnel as a riddle, tunnel as a route, shelter or a hazard. Tunnel as a beginning, middle part and an ending.

Participating artists: Heleliis Hõim, Carl-Robert Kagge, Hanna-Liisa Lavonen, Anu Lehis, Solveig Lill and Miina Peterson.
Tutors of the course are Jaan Toomik and Vladimir Dubossarsky.

Musical performance by the band St. Cheatersburg https://cheatersburg.bandcamp.com/.

We recommend to bring cash and dress according to the outside temperature.

Opening at 29th of November at 6 pm.

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Open Lecture: MANJA VAN DE WORP on 30th November

Pulp Pavilion, built for the 2015 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in the California desert, using reclaimed paper.

 

Manja Van de Worp: “New Engineering typologies: not a hybrid – just new”

The penultimate lecturer of the Open Lecture Series this semester will be architect and engineer MANJA VAN DE WORP, director of YIP Structural Engineering London (formerly, NOUS Engineering), who will be stepping on the stage of Kanuti Gildi SAAL (Pikk 20, Tallinn) on the 30th of November at 6 pm. The lecture, as usual, is in English and free for everyone. Van de Worp’s work is focussed on the future of architectural engineering and she’ll be focussing on the new typologies of engineering in her Tallinn lecture.

Van de Worp holds Master degrees in Architecture, Structural Engineering and in Emergent Technologies and Design. She is a structural engineer with 10 years professional experience in the Construction Industry focusing on Structure, Geometry and Fabrication, while teaching at the RCA, Architectural Association & IAAC. Van de Worp has previously worked for Arup in London in the Advanced Geometry Unit and at the Advanced Technology and Research group, designing structures with a complex geometry and moveable structures.

She also launched NOUS engineering London (now YIP) in 2013 as an engineering consultancy bearing extensive knowledge of advanced structural analysis tools, complex structural systems, materials and fabrication technologies. Their current projects involve a FRP shell and a modular steel roof structure. YIP also focuses on structural product design and research based projects, looking at innovative ways to use timber, 3D printing of concrete, searching how materials not conventionally used in structural design could find their way into building engineering.

Among the largest projects that she has lately been working on is the Leadenhall Building in London, completed in 2014 (project engineer, AT&R Arup; architects: Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners) The 225 m/48-floor Leadenhall Building, also known as the cheese grater, has a steel mega frame, that provides stability to the entire structure and is the worlds tallest of its kind. The ultra lightweight prefabricated floor system allows for a shallow floor and a lighter foundation. Due to footfall, all frames had to be individually designed and the connections developed and tested in collaboration with the contractor.

Currently, van de Worp is focused on the NUS kinetic facade project in Singapore. Designed by architect Joseph Lim, the social housing project has retractable origami façade that forms an external shading device, based on the Momotani folding pattern.

More about Manja van de Worp: http://www.nousengineering.com/

The architecture and urban planning department of the Estonian Academy of Arts has been curating the Open Lectures on Architecture series since 2012 – each year, a dozen architects, urbanists, both practicing as well as academics, introduce their work and field of research to the audience in Tallinn. All Open Lectures are free of charge, in English, take place every fortnight, and are open to everyone – for both students and professionals of the field, general audience and students considering architecture for their further studies. The series is funded by the Estonian Cultural Endowment and curated by Sille Pihlak and Siim Tuksam.

www.avatudloengud.ee
https://www.facebook.com/EKAarhitektuur/

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Lecture: JOHAN PAJU, Urban Biotopes – a case study of Social Nature in Stockholm

At 5.30 pm this Thursday, on the 23rd Nov, everyone’s welcome to the architecture department (Pikk 20, 3rd floor) for lecture “Urban Biotopes – A case study of Social Nature in Stockholm, Sweden” by Stockholm-based architect and landscape architect Johan Paju.

During the last century, we lost track of natural systems in the cityscape. Johan Paju will discuss how to re-introduce a “biotope thinking” into urban landscapes through an understanding of deep structure and landscape ecology. The lecture will focus on Nordic climates, a case study of the “Taklandskapet” (The Roof Top Landscape) of Sveavägen 44 in Stockholm and basic principles of biotope design and practice by URBANGREEN. The lecture will be held in English and open for all.

Johan Paju is one of Sweden’s foremost landscape architects and has previously taught at KTH-A in Stockholm over 15 years in landscape architecture and urban design. 1998, he was one of the founders of NOD -nature oriented design and is now co-owner and Creative Director of Fojab architects, one of Sweden’s largest architectural firms. He has been active all over the world, but with a strong focus on Nordic architecture and process-oriented solutions. He got the Siena Prize in 2015 for the best landscape project in Sweden. Johan Paju has been Chairman of Stockholm’s Architectural Association as well as for the Swedish Association of Architects Academy for Landscape Architecture.

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System & Error workshop by Aalto University and Estonian Academy of Arts

Workshop in Tallinn (Friday, 24th Nov) Lembitu 12, 3rd floor Photography Dept.

Ordinary life is made of eventful junctures, constant surprises and adjustments that go beyond all attempts to rigorously plan and design things. Buildings and infrastructures crack. Smart phones make errors. Printers print funny stuff. The state and the financial market fail. Also our body can react strangely. All these failures have an aura: they do not occur twice in the same way and produce the vertigo of disturbances and the adrenaline of edges. Likewise, systems are organised by defining why something is proper and some others are a failure. The exclusion of the deviant (noise, dirt, queer and so on) informs us about a general order of things. But errors also tell about accidental findings, entropy, gaps, tricksters, hackers… and make evident the possibility of becoming something else.

The students will engage with how failures, misbehaviours, and things out of place constitute a terrain of interstitiality. Everyday we see how somethings and some people are obdurate in their obsolescence, persisting in failures and awkwardness, refusing to accept their superfluous and redundant character, sticking to the analogical, not catching up or stepping out of assigned compartments and classifications. Hence the exhibition is proposed as a platform for exploring how failure entails iconoclastic action, often painful, fragile, bloody, but it also generates moments of inception, vitality and serendipity.

The workshop will thus address different notions of failure and diverse meanings of systems, randomness and dead ends, dealing therefore with questions such as:

  • Do failures need an excuse? What does an error look like?
  • Are errors merely failed expressions of a system or have rather an autonomous entity?
  • What is the benefit of being part of a system?
  • Which are the aesthetics of systems, networks and infrastructures? How much tolerance for the non-perfect do our societies have?
  • Is a list of failures more revealing than a list of successes?
  • What do we have to lose in order to create?
  • And does anything right might come from pursuing wrong practices?

 

Programme 24th of November

10:00 Guided tour to EKKM by Kirill Tulin, introducing his exhibition: ‘Help to the stoker of the central heating boiler’

12:00 Snack Lunch (provided for registered participants) 13:20 Francisco Martínez, Aalto, anthropologist
14:00 Liina Siib, EKA, artist
14:30 Patrick Laviolette, Tallinn University, anthropologist 15:15 Coffee break

15:30 Oliver Laas, EKA, philosopher
16:10 Camille Laurelli, EKA, Artist
16:45 Ingel Vaikla, Ghent, Filmmaker
17:30 Tutoring and practical workshop
18:30 Dinner (provided for registered participants)

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Open Lecture: MATTHIAS RIPPMANN on 16th November at 18:00

Droneport Prototype. Venice Architecture Biennale 2016

Department of Architecture and Urban Design of the Estonian Academy of Arts is happy to present the Open Lecture Series lineup for the autumn semester – a number of exciting architects, urban planners, academics from across the world. The lectures are free of charge, in English, take place every fortnight, and are open to everyone – for both students and professionals of the field, general audience and students considering architecture for their further studies. 

The fourth speaker of the Autumn semester is Matthias Rippmann – member of the team led by ETH Zurich researchers that constructed the Armadillo Vault – an expansive canopy using 399 slabs of limestone and no glue – for the 2016 Venice biennale main exhibition. Rippmann’s lecture in Tallinn at 6 pm on the 16th of November (Kanuti Gildi SAAL, Pikk 20) will also revolve around innovative new uses of limestone in architecture, making this a lecture interesting for architects as well as interior architects, designers and material researchers.

Matthias Rippmann has been a member of the Block Research Group since 2010, where he obtained his doctorate in 2016. Currently, he is a postdoctoral researcher, leading the BRG’s digital fabrication research in the National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) Digital Fabrication. He conducts research in the field of structurally informed design and digital fabrication. He is the developer of the form-finding software RhinoVAULT, which offers TNA-based exploration of funicular shells. He studied architecture at the University of Stuttgart and the University of Melbourne. He worked in Stuttgart at Behnisch Architekten, LAVA, the Institute for Lightweight Structures and Conceptual Design and Werner Sobek Engineers. In 2010, he co-founded the architecture and consultancy firm Rippmann Oesterle Knauss GmbH (ROK).

The series is funded by the Estonian Cultural Endowment
Curators: Sille Pihlak, Siim Tuksam
www.avatudloengud.ee
https://www.facebook.com/EKAarhitektuur/

More info:
Pille Epner / E-post: arhitektuur@artun.ee / Tel. +372 642 0071

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Architecture Open Lecture Series on 2nd of November: Didier Fiuza Faustino

 

Mexico City projekt “Foundation Alumnos47” Didier Faustino // Mesarchitecture


On the 2nd of November, Architecture Open Lecture Series will host architect and artist Didier Fiuza Faustino. Starting at 6 pm, this lecture will take place at the Von Krahl Theatre (Rataskaevu 10).

This autumn, the Faculty of Architecture and Urban Design of the Estonian Academy of Arts is inviting a number of exciting architects, urban planners, academics from across the world to Tallinn for the Open Lecture Series. The lectures are free of charge, in English, take place every fortnight, and are open to everyone – for both students and professionals of the field, general audience and students considering architecture for their further studies.

Arriving to Tallinn on the 2nd of November is Paris-based architect and artist Didier Fiuza Faustino, who is focused on how people relate to space and creates human-scale spaces. Faustino’s spatial installations are especially well known: he’s designed striking temporary stages that invite people to perform and speak up, as well as created spatial installation projects for exhibitions, asking questions about the sense of a space. Faustino’s lecture titled “Unbuilt memories” is one that also sculpture, installation, spatial design and interior architecture students, lecturers and audience should definitely not miss. All open talks are free and in English.

Didier Fiuza Faustino is an architect and artist working on the relationship between body and space. He started his own practice at the crossroad of art and architecture just after graduating in architecture in 1995. He has been developing since then a multi-faceted approach, ranging from installation to experimentation, from visual art to the creation of multi-sensorial spaces, mobile architecture and buildings. After teaching six years at the AA School in London and being two years editor in chief of the French architecture and design magazine CREE in 2015 and 2016, Didier Faustino is currently fully dedicating his time on architecture projects (Mexico, Costa Rica, Belgium, Portugal and France) and art installation and exhibitions (Vienna, Geneva, Lisbon, Los Angeles).

More about Didier Fiuza Faustino: http://www.didierfaustino.com/

The Faculty of architecture and urban design of the Estonian Academy of Arts has been curating the Open Lectures on Architecture series since 2012 – each year, a dozen architects, urbanists, both practicing as well as academics, introduce their work and field of research to the audience in Tallinn. All lectures are in English, free and open to all interested.

The series is funded by the Estonian Cultural Endowment
Curators: Sille Pihlak, Siim Tuksam

www.avatudloengud.ee
https://www.facebook.com/EKAarhitektuur/

More info: Pille Epner / arhitektuur@artun.ee / +372 642 0071

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The Mereological City: Open Lecture by Daniel Köhler on 19th November

 

Daniel Koehler – The Mereological City 2014
Model, scale 1:10000: computational model based on the Vertical City Schema by Ludwig Hilberseimer.

On 19th of November at 6 pm, the Open Lecture series will continue with architect, urbanist and researcher Daniel Köhler, arriving in Tallinn from London where he teaches at the Bartlett School of Architecture. In his research and in his lecture in Tallinn, Köhler focuses on the mereology of cities – how particles form a whole in the example of cities, making this a lecture that in addition to architects should definitely capture the attention of urbanists.

At the Bartlett School of Architecture, Köhler leads a Research Cluster in Urban Design and is the Coordinator of the Theory and History Module of the Postgraduate B-Pro Architecture Design Program. Furthermore, he is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Innsbruck and the co-founder of the Lab for Environmental Design Strategies. Köhler has taught at the Aalto University, Vilnius Art Academy, Sci-Arc, Städelschule and the University of East London. In 2016, Köhler published “The Mereological City”, a study on the modes of part-to-whole relations between architecture and its city during modernism. His recent research investigates on the physical implications of digital logistics: cities designed by pure quantities and their architecture.

Mereology is a branch of ontology that discusses part to whole relationships. When we say that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, we are performing a mereological equation. Köhler describes the architecture of the city as a compositional tension, realized with a multiplicity of buildings, with the city itself.

http://www.lab-eds.org/The-Mereological-City

More about Daniel Köhler: http://www.lab-eds.org/

The Open Lecture Series brings to Tallinn a number of exciting architects, urban planners, academics from across the world. All Open Lectures are free of charge, in English, take place every fortnight, and are open to everyone – for both students and professionals of the field, general audience and students considering architecture for their further studies.

The Faculty of Architecture of the Estonian Academy of Arts has been curating the Open Lectures series since 2012 – each year, a dozen architects, urbanists, both practicing as well as academics, introduce their work and field of research to the audience in Tallinn.

The series is funded by the Estonian Cultural Endowment

Curators: Sille Pihlak, Siim Tuksam

www.avatudloengud.ee
https://www.facebook.com/EKAarhitektuur/

More info: Pille Epner / arhitektuur@artun.ee / +372 642 0071

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2018-2019 Fulbright Scholar Program

2018-2019 Fulbright Scholar Program

The Fulbright Scholar Program in Estonia offers research grants for Estonian scholars and researchers to conduct research at universities or special libraries/collections in the United States in all fields, except for medical studies involving direct patient contact. Candidates may be university teachers or researchers, or professionals whose expertise would be enhanced by further study or research in their field.

Grants are awarded for a period of three to nine months within one study year. The grants are awarded on a competitive basis and are subject to fund availability.

Eligibility requirements for Estonian researchers:

  • Estonian citizenship
  • Doctoral degree or equivalent professional training or experience (in liberal arts)
  • English proficiency appropriate to the proposed lecturing or research project
  • Detailed statement of proposed activity for research or lecturing at an American institution                  

Candidates with an invitation letter/affiliation negotiations confirmation from a U.S. institution are preferred

Please visit the Fulbright Program Application Database  to start your on-line application. After filling out the on-line application, please also submit a paper copy of the application together with other related documents, to:

 

Jane Susi

Fulbright Program
Embassy of the United States of America
Kentmanni 20
15099 Tallinn

 

Finalists will be interviewed in early January by a bi-national (American-Estonian) selection committee.

The application deadline for the 2018-2019 academic year is December 11, 2017

 

The Fulbright program is administered by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs which is represented in Estonia by the U.S. Embassy Public Affairs Section. The primary purpose of the Fulbright program is to promote mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the peoples of other countries through a variety of educational activities.

For more information please contact the U.S. Embassy Public Affairs Section, phone: (372) 668 8155, E-mail: susij@state.gov

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1.06–22.06.2017. Keiu Maasik “Lost friends”

Keiu Maasik will open her exhibition “Lost Friends” in EAA Gallery (Freedom Square 6/8) at 6pm on Thursday, June 1st, 2017. “Lost Friends” is the joint project of two sisters – the artist Keiu and Kaisa, the curator of the exhibition. It speaks about losing touch with friends through the story of one friend-group.

The photo- and video exhibition talks about the weakening of bonds, tying the process to growing up. Documentary images of a teenager’s life in the suburbs, a cross-section of the buildings in the area, and the big shopping centers in its vicinity demonstrate a universal process – the losing of friend and the reasons for it.

Curator: Kaisa Maasik.
Graphic design: Anna Kaarma

The exhibition could not have happened without the support of CNC Stuudio, Eesti Kultuurkapital, Estonian Academy of Arts, Laserstuudio, the Estonian Land Board and Perioodika Repro LLC.

Acknowledgements: Kreete Alasoo, the photography department of the Estonian Academy of Arts, Kristiina Kams, Madis Kurss, the Maasik family, Jarmo Nagel, Martin Teder, Tarvo Hanno Varres, Reimo Võsa-Tangsoo.

Exhibition will be open until June 22, 2017.

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13.09–30.09.2017. WHISPERING STONES. KHURTOVA & BOURLANGES.

Elena Khurtova & Marie Bourlanges present an interactive sound installation “Whispering Stones” inspired by a peculiar text dedicated to the star constellation of Cephea. Playing with the double etymology of Cephea as “stone” and “head”, the duo explores the fictional narratives superimposed on natural elements like stones, and attempt to give them back their own “voice”. Referring to ritual practices with healing stones found in the Cévennes region of France, Khurtova and Bourlanges experiment with touching over recreated stones, enabling them to “speak”.

Playing with the acoustic and spacious quality of the exhibition space in dialogue with the tactility of porcelain pieces, the installation will generate an immersive sound and visual experience. “Cephea’s chanting stones” is part of the fourth chapter of Khurtova & Bourlanges’ current project “the Sky is on the Earth” based on the archive of Jacques Bourlanges, connecting star constellations and land geography.

This project is made possible with the support of Mondriaan Fund and Stichting Stokroos.

Guided tour on 26th of September at 7.30 pm, the event is part of Tallinn Tuesday programme.

www.theskyisontheearth.com

Event is produced by Tallinn Architecture Biennale. Supporters: French Institute, Beweship Eesti, EKA Gallery

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Expert committee: the Estonian Academy of Arts and its activities have visibility both in Estonia and internationally

The Quality Assessment Council of the Estonian Quality Agency for Higher and Vocational Education (EKKA) has given institutional accreditation to the Estonian Academy of Arts for the maximum period of seven years.

The international committee that carried out the assessment highlighted EAA’s thorough and participatory development activities and cooperation both within Estonia and internationally. Special praise was extended to EAA’s innovative collaboration with interest groups, state institutions and the creative industry. The assessment report points out that the public exhibitions, performances and events organised by EAA have visibility in Estonian society. EAA faculties participate in international festivals, fairs, exhibitions and conferences. EAA students successfully take part in international competitions.

The assessment team and the EKKA Quality Assessment Council for Higher Education both concluded that in comparison to other institutions of higher education in Estonia, EAA’s international outreach is one the strongest in regard to the mobility of both students and the teaching staff, by using the possibilities provided by the Erasmus programme and participating in Nordplus and other similar international networks.

Experts were impressed by the fact that EAA was listed among the top 200 art and design universities in the QS World University Ranking.

As to recommendations, the assessment team pointed at the need to critically evaluate EAA’s organisational structure in order to harmonise it, and to clearly define the competences, tasks, membership, activities and lines of communication for all units. In order to utilise the full potential of the new academic building, inter- and transdisciplinary collaboration between the faculties, with other universities and outside of the academic sphere should be strengthened.

In their report the assessment team emphasised the importance of artistic research in art education and invited the education policy makers in Estonia to find opportunities to finance artistic research in a more systematic manner. The current financing model does not sufficiently consider the specifics of the field, thereby putting art students at a disadvantage compared to other disciplines.

In commenting on the results, Rector of the Estonian Academy of Arts Mart Kalm stated: “No-one in Estonia doubts that EAA is an excellent school, but we now have one more international certificate to prove it. The praise was justly rewarded after all the hard work EAA employees put into preparing for the accreditation and analysing our in-house processes. All the accreditations and evaluations that we went through over the past winter are not just bureaucratic excess: I believe that we have learned to better organise our work because of them.”

Along with the accreditation, the institution of higher education was also awarded the EKKA Quality Label, which attests that the institution is efficiently managed, its study and research activities are on an internationally competitive level and that the institution contributes to the development of society.

The decision of the Quality Assessment Council is available here (in Estonian).

The goal of external evaluation is to support the development of strategic management and quality culture in Estonian higher education institutions. All higher education institutions in Estonia must undergo institutional accreditation once every seven years.

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Tallinn Summer Academy 2017 – Toys for Elephants video

http://https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WqYNBZBqZg&t=20s
During Tallinn Summer Academy 2017, the Estonian Academy of Arts Department of Product Design invited students to participate in an international workshop entitled Toys for Elephants.
Elephants in the Tallinn Zoo needed a change of pace to keep their minds sharp. The Tallinn Zoo set the goal of creating a selection of toys for elephants to raise their cognitive capacity. The toys were meant for either indoor or outdoor play. One particularity of the workshop was the unusual target group and the scale – the toys must be large in order to engage the elephants and take into account their weight. A toy for an elephant could weigh around 1 tonne. The construction specification sheet was also different from the norm: the solutions have to come in special dimensions and be able to withstand extreme conditions. The workshop took place at the Tallinn Zoo.
The tutors for the course were: Lauri Snellman, University of Lapland in Finland Runa Thors, Iceland Academy of Arts Lennart Mänd and Merike Rehepapp from Estonian Academy of Arts
Big thanks to Darja Zubareva, Educationist at Tallinn Zoo
Participants of the workshop: Andres Mutis Iris Indridadottir Signý Jónsdóttir Ólöf Sigþórsdóttir Uliana Reutina Barbara Drozdek Kristina Hemkemeier Timo Treit Juho Saavalainen Ville Määttänen Suvi Pietilä Tatiana Kravtsov Renata Johanson Rünno Kulver Lisandra Türkson Marlen Peets Hannes Tõnuri Liina Kurvits Siim Jesper Varblane Magnus Sirelmets Joosep Laht
Read more about the Tallinn Summer Academy www.artun.ee/summeracademy New application period will start in the spring 2018.
Video, editing and original music by Robin Nõgisto

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ArtCar Project – Final Entrepreneurship Course

The final entrepreneurship course, called Self-Organising in Art, is available here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1mJvWv2sQny4ekU9RtpkXDWq-78Qu5R2IPpptGD690Cw/edit – gid=0

CLICK ON THE LINK TO SEE THE BOOKLET ABOUT THE PROJECT AND ITS OUTCOMES: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TroN4nNo1QR7OOjswAIIlq7fCpuiMt7m/view?usp=sharing

By the end of the project, 101 students participated in the course – 41 more than planned. This means the course raised interest in students, as they found a lack of practical material in their other coursework. Here are some responses from the feedback questionnaire to the question: Do you find that the course should be part of your curriculum?

Lithuania:

It should be mandatory. It contains essential information all artists should know.”

It’s a necessary look into the ‘real world.’”

To be honest, I think that every student in the academy should attend this course, because it is a survival guide for a young artist.”

Denmark:

“Definitely! I always missed a course like that. Unfortunately, in art schools there is too little communication about the time after graduating and what possibilities you have.”

“Yes, because after feeling safe in your artistic practice, how you continue your practice in the post-school world is the most important.”

Estonia:

“Yes, because without it, it would be hard to make sense of the art world in all its complexity.”

Feedback from a lecturer

I am glad to have had the opportunity to participate in the Art Car course project and be one of the Self Organising in Art’s course lecturers.

Firstly, if assessing my own study experience in Vilnius Academy of Fine Arts and today’s study program, there is still a lack of self-organization, project management and art curating courses dedicated to art students.

Expanded look at the contemporary art and culture market is very useful, so concentrated different profile lectures, contemporary art and culture field presentation is very actual gesture in studying process.

During the course, students were introduced to the basic principles of how to organise the project. They had an opportunity to bring closer to the real implementation of their artistic ideas and conceptions and understand the mechanisms of culture financing, which essentially applies to both local and international projects, residencies and other educational and social projects.

It’s very delighting that students are not afraid of collaboration and team work. Students of different specialties worked in groups, were able to discuss and look for common solutions, share responsibilities and jobs and use each other’s strengths and improve weaknesses.

The course was to prepare more than 10 successful projects through two semesters, one of which already saw the light of day for the course only halfway through. I very hope, that students won’t lose the knowledge and courage they gained during the course, and become very active participants of Lithuanian cultural life.

Elena Grudzinskaitė

Lecturer

Vilnius Academy of Arts

 

The project is funded by Nordplus Horizontal

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ArtCar Project – Students’ projects

Students’ final projects

Tallinn
● An online channel with weekly animated episodes 
● An artist group working with the topic of sustainable materials in architecture ● Site-specific installations in public spaces A concert-screening

Vilnius
● Community building in Vilnius districts: creative workshops in a variety of districts in Vilnius
● Zine Jam “Marmelade”: 20 artists selected through open call gather in a specific space and creates zines for 48 hours straight on themes related to the city/space where the jam is happening.
● “Mission: Siberia” creative workshops
● Socially integrated project “Chain”: a project to raise awareness about homeless dogs by attracting people to a building where street art is being made while inside an interactive installation on homeless dogs takes place
● Collaborative, sight-specific art project
● Yoga rave in Morocco: project aims to organise yoga rave parties (discos without alcohol and drugs) in Morocco
● Exhibition “Aesthetics of Social Failure” in project space Studium P (Lithuania): project aims to prepare a manual on safe behavior on social networks and also to create an exhibition on the theme. ● Kurk Kurk – creative printmaking and bookbinding workshops that are led through one year (2016) in festivals and cultural institutions

Copenhagen ● personal projects for Rundgang 2017 ● applications or artist statements ● project about the Baltic Sea and the North Sea which will be exhibited in Great Britain ● applications for financing the reconstruction of a former artist-run project space at Charlottenborg ● project about historical cultural exchange between Lithuania and Denmark.

INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITIONS

During the course we tried to encourage cooperation between students and the project spaces, but it didn’t seem to work too well. The first year we tried to start the collaborative projects during our crash course in Tallinn and, in the second year, during our presentation and networking event in Nida. In Nida, five mini-presentations were held in a manner we could call performances, and many participating students showed their works in exhibitions/events like EAA Tase, VAA Rundgang, and RDAA Rundgang. Two students from the Copenhagen event successfully applied for a residency in Nida. Also, there is an open call coming up in autumn 2017 for the EAA gallery in Tallinn, which we are going to promote among participating students.

A crash course was held in Tallinn January 4-8, 2016. This was led by Kulla Laas and Aap Tepper (Rundum Artist-Run Space) with 23 participants from Denmark, Lithuania and Estonia.

The objectives were: 1) Provide necessary practical tools for carrying out one’s art practises 2) Encourage the start of own-initiative projects and see art projects as more than something based on the institutional gallery system and existing infrastructure. Instead work with a goal to create a new situation according to one’s own needs and desirable working conditions.

Goal:
To develop/imagine a plan for an initiative/project/organisation/event/artist group/festival/etc. that develops, improves your working/living conditions

Outcome:
The first part of the week was more theory oriented and the latter concentrated on mapping ideas and group work. During evening seminars students showed great interest in each other and from this we saw a group emerge. On the last day we summarized the ideas students had worked on. Two major lines of interest emerged: 1) the idea to start a student-driven network, and 2) to start a collaboration between the academy galleries. The underlying topic that came out of the course was that students wanted to look outside of their small art scenes (bubbles) and thought that meeting and collaborating with students from other schools would be help their practises progress.

Conclusion:
Levels of experience in such a large group of students varied a lot, which made it hard to get to a single, specific outcome. Some of the students had already been doing self-initiated projects for a while and saw the intensive course as a way of networking and finding new collaborations. The course was a good way of sharing experiences by introducing individual initiatives. The crash course didn’t work as planned, because not all the students who participated in the crash course continued with the main course later on.

During the project partners’ meeting in May 2016, we decided to make the intensive networking- and presentation-oriented course after, and not before, the main course. We hoped that when the students already brought their own projects, they could find partners by presenting them to each other at the Nida Art Colony.

ArtCar project’s presentation and networking event in Nida, May 3-7, 2017. We asked all students to bring one project to Nida so they could realize it there, or to collaborate with each other if needed. We had 20 participants from EAA, VAA and RDAA, as well as representatives of project spaces and course leaders.

The objectives were: 1) Get to know each-others practises, 2) Get to know the real life of project spaces and artist-run spaces, 3) Encourage the start of own-initiative projects/exhibitions internationally and locally, 4) Find international collaborators among each other

Goal:
To develop/imagine a plan for an initiative/project/organisation/event/artist group/festival/exhibition/etc., and present it on the final day to the group.

Outcome:
The first part of the event was getting to know each other and everyone’s practises; people started to form groups. On the last they all the groups and some individuals presented what they had worked on during the three days.

Students’ projects in Nida:

1) “Building a hole / digging a dune.” A collaborative, process-based performance that was documented and then presented to the group. It dealt with site-specific cognition on the Nida peninsula.

2) The Danish duo presented their project – a fictive narration of how finding a space to work can become more energy absorbing than working itself.

3) The international exhibition program, “Happiness.” A group of students plans to realise an exhibition program in a variety of locations in all three countries. They presented potential exhibition spaces and funding possibilities.

4) An individual project of one student who further developed his experimental printmaking by trying out different copy-machine printing and folding possibilities.

5) Another individual project of a student who brought her self-made virtual reality glasses to Nida and integrated the dunes of Nida into her work.

Conclusion:
The event was a good way of getting to know how different universities and students work, as well as learning about project spaces. The networking and presentation event didn’t work quite as planned, though we got more actual results than in the crash course in 2016. Even after e-mailing and Skype calls, it seemed all the three countries had a bit different idea of what this event should be about.

For the future: more clear and precise leadership from the main project manager.

LOCAL EXHIBITIONS

Many exhibitions and public events/installations were realized during our two years.

Estonia

Robin Nõgisto – showed his painting and video during the TASE’17 exhibition

Tase’17 photos are here: https://www.facebook.com/pg/Eestikunstiakadeemia/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1558671077497272

Jenny Grönholm – had her solo exhibition at Hobusepea Gallery, Tallinn http://www.eaa.ee/hobusepea/english/enindex.htm and is curating, with Johann Pajupuu, a showcase-space in a public room

Johanna Mudist – made small drawing during her walk in Nida which she will use in her artistic practise. Presented her paintings and drawings in the TASE’17 exhibition. https://www.facebook.com/pg/Eestikunstiakadeemia/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1558671077497272

Johann Pajupuu – curating with Jenny Grönholm showcase-space in a public room

Ann Rieberg – realized her idea of a public installation on the beach

Lithuania

Zine Jam “Marmelade”: 20 artists selected through an open call gather in a specific space and create zines for 48 hours straight on themes related to the city/space where the jam takes place. This project was realized in Nida Art Colony in 2016. Here are some photographs from the workshop and a brief description of the goals of the project: http://vda.lt/en/study_programs/undergraduate-ba/graphic-art/graphic-art-undergraduate/activities/creative-workshopsprojects/the-zine-jamm

Kurk Kurk is creative printmaking and bookbinding workshops, which are led throughout one year (2016) at festivals and in culture institutions. Here is their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/kurkurk/

Denmark

Isabella Martin. MFA. Worked on a project for Rundgang http://www.kunstakademiet.dk/en/activities-news/current-events/rundgang-2017 and on a larger project about the Baltic Sea and the North Sea which will be exhibited in Great Britain.

Sophie Meuresch. Exchange student from Germany. MFA. Worked on a project for Rundgang.

Anne Sofie Skjold Møller. BFA. Worked on a project for Rundgang and applications for financing the reconstruction of a former artist-run project space at Charlottenborg.

Signe Boe Pedersen. MFA. Worked on a project about historical cultural exchange between Lithuania and Denmark with Marie Raffn. Created applications for Nida Art Colony (granted) and other residencies for research during the course. Teaser video for Rundgang https://vimeo.com/221545079

Hannah Sehl. Exchange student from Germany. MFA. Worked on her thesis, and after Nida she has been working with Adam Fenton on a collaborative project for Rundgang.

Adam Fenton. MFA. Working with Hannah Sehl on a collaborative project for Rundgang.

Sophia Vanhala. BFA. Worked on a project for Rundgang.

Marie Raffn. Graduated. Collaborative partner of Signe Boe Pedersen. Working on a project about historical cultural exchanges between Lithuania and Denmark. Created applications for Nida Art Colony (granted) and other residencies for research during the course.

The project is funded by Nordplus Horizontal

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ArtCar Project – SELF-ORGANISING IN ART, ORGANIZING, NAVIGATION AND OPERATIONAL SPACE, CREATIVE INDUSTRIES, UDENOM/AROUND

On first year, in Tallinn and Vilnius, the course was titled Self-Organising in Art and in Copenhagen Organizing, Navigation and Operational Space. On second year, in Estonia, the course was called Creative Industries, in Lithuania, Self-Organising in Art, and in Denmark, Udenom/Around. During the period 2015-2017 we had 101 participants: 54 in Vilnius, 25 in Tallinn, and 22 in Copenhagen.

The elective course, second year

In Estonia, the course was called Creative Industries. The course offered three ECTS credits, and was compulsory for second-year MA students of Fine Arts (painting, printmaking, installation and sculpture, scenography, animation). The course took place in the autumn semester with 17 participants.

In Lithuania, the course was called Self-Organising in Art and offered three ECTS credits. It was an elective course for BA and MA students in Fine Arts and Cultural Management, held in the autumn semester with 28 participants.

In Denmark, the course was called Udenom/Around (two ECTS credits) and had 14 students from Fine Arts (12 MFA, one BFA, and one alumna who was a collaborative partner of one participating student).

MORE ABOUT THE CONTENT OF THE COURSES

Vilnius Academy of Arts used this draft https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1mJvWv2sQny4ekU9RtpkXDWq-78Qu5R2IPpptGD690Cw/edit – gid=0 sent before the course. They had 28 Fine Arts students, both BA and MA, including cultural managers who worked in larger groups. The course was led by Elena Grudzinskaitė, Rasa Kavaliauskaitė, and Daina Pupkevičiūtė. On the first year the course got a great feedback from the students, so there was no need to change the content of the course for the second year.

During the courses, lectures were conducted on a variety of topics important for working in the arts, as well as aspects of self-organisation and the local art field. All this knowledge had to be used in the development of students’ personal projects that combined a practical action plan and an idea plan. Projects did not have to be realized during the course, but it was required they be thought through in detail. Project progress was discussed in seminars and presented at the final meeting.

Seminars: Students presented their interests in self-organising connected to their artistic practices, discussed their thoughts in seminars, gathered material, made sketches, wrote idea plans, and considered practical aspects of realizing their projects (location, permissions, funding, technical support, communication, etc.).

The Estonian Academy of Arts took the same draft for the first year and on the second it emerged with a course led by Elin Kard (gallerist for two Estonian Artists’ Association galleries, Hobusepea and Draakoni, and Vice President of the Estonian Artists’ Association), and it became a compulsory entrepreneurship course for the MA level. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1qQSTYYf1xQAVo_BrI1r2b5HXLtNiS2AvI0skmbSv39c/edit?usp=sharing

Estonia had fourteen students and the course topics were same as in Vilnius Academy of Arts. Great emphasis was on planning personal budgets, requesting funds from the Estonian Cultural Endowment, Estonia’s most-used method of funding artistic activities. Progress of the projects was discussed personally with the course leader and presented to her only.

The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Visual Arts

First year, 14 meetings of 3 hours each, running from early January to late-June. The course took the form of a working group, and consisted of a mixture of short presentations, readings, site-
visits and conversations. Students’ own practices were a central part running through the entire course. They were asked to bring a current or new project, or their practice at large. The key thing was that they brought something they wanted to share and work with for the duration of the course. There was no demand beyond that of figuring out ways of bringing parts of their practice into the collective setting.

The overall aim of the course was to discuss a more differentiated and open way of thinking and practicing art. Students were asked to write a resume, an artist statement, funding applications, etc. That is, ways of relating and engaging with the art world and beyond. In full, this is a question of what kind of life one wants as an artist. This way of thinking artistic practices, can be called systemic, organizational and structural. When talking of how one might relate ones practice to new entities, it reflects back on ones understanding of what ones practice is or can be, what makes it distinct, from other modes of existence, what makes artistic practice distinct from other practices. The course was led by David Hilmer Rex (Diakron platform-studio)

The course plan: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1p4RxwMs6v3RWytuTycomwVze2YLj3rncBKztQIUsO_A/edit

Second year, also 13 meetings of three to six hours each, depending on the topic and the activites (visiting museums, galleries, artist studios). The course was a low-practice course about the unavoidable crust that forms around one’s art production when one graduates from the academy. The course consisted of mapping the art world, project initiations, writing applications, visiting the Danish Art Council, budgets and financing, visiting three galleries, and reviewing CVs and portfolios. Parallel to the theoretical part, everyone started to develop their own personal projects and presented them in Nida (Lithuania) where we had our networking and presentation event. The course was led by Ditte Soria and Anna Margrethe Pedersen (Years exhibition space).

The course plan: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4TjO0nsiGzybmhocWM2WFU1U1E/view?usp=sharing

The project is funded by Nordplus Horizontal

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ArtCar Project – Career in Creative Industries for Artists 2015-2017

The ArtCar project was meant for developing a common entrepreneurship course for Fine Arts curriculums in the Nordic-Baltic educational region. Its goals were to expand employment opportunities for graduates of Fine Arts faculties and to provide practical professional experience to increase access to employment or the creation of new job opportunities. ArtCar was constructed based on the practices of three different university representatives, the knowledge and experience of three different exhibition space representatives, and the ideas and wishes of students and other supporting parties.

In 2015 there were not enough basic courses in entrepreneurship and the creative industries in Estonian Academy of Arts Fine Arts departments. (We define the Fine Arts department to include students who study painting, printmaking, sculpture, installation, new media, drawing, and animation.) In the Estonian Academy of Arts only one semester-long course was offered, and this in the animation department at the MA level. Worldwide, youth unemployment figures (ages 15-24) have not changed significantly over the last decade, nor are they expected to improve in the next few years. The youth unemployment rate in EU countries for May 2017: Greece – 46,6%, Spain – 38,6%, Italy – 37%, Finland – 20.4%, Estonia – 18.3 %, Sweden – 17,4%, Lithuania – 12.5%, Denmark – 11.1 % (Source: https://www.statista.com/statistics/266228/youth-unemployment-rate-in-eu-countries/ )

We chose the Nordplus Horizontal project, because the aims of the Horizontal project shares the values and ideas of our project.
We create a cross-sectoral education network between universities and project spaces, which are mostly NGOs, because project space or artist-run space management is one option for starting alternative entrepreneurship. NGOs have practical experience of entrepreneurship to share with students, and some team members may even have studied Fine Arts (e.g. the Rundum Project Space in Estonia, where all team members from the project space are photography students). Exhibition spaces provide guidance and opportunity for students to obtain an inside view of entrepreneurship and project space management.

We created a network between universities which were interested in updating their curriculum, increasing employment opportunities among Fine Arts graduates, international collaboration through shared practices, and developing a creative industries course for Fine Arts department in the region.

We created a network between exhibition spaces which were interested in exchanging best practices, creating international projects, cooperating with universities (being guest lecturers), and contributing their knowledge about bringing together entrepreneurship, creative industries and fine arts.

ArtCar project is a collaboration between:


Estonian Academy of Arts www.artun.ee

The Royal Danish Academy of Arts, Schools of Visual Arts  http://www.kunstakademiet.dk/en

Vilnius Art Academy  http://www.vda.lt/en/

Lithuanian Interdisciplinary Artist Association http://www.letmekoo.lt/en/

Rundum Artist-Run Space www.rundumspace.com

Diakron platform-studio http://www.diakron.dk/organisation

Estonian Contemporary Art Development Center http://www.ecadc.ee/about/

Years Exhibition Space www.years.dk

The project is funded by Nordplus Horizontal

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OPEN LECTURE_Jewellery artist Philip Sajet `THE BATTLE FOR BEAUTY`

On Wednesday, 4 Oct at 5.30pm will be open lecture “The Battle For Beauty” by jewellery artist Philip Sajet (The Netherlands/France).
The lecture will take place at Estonia pst 7, room 426.
*
www.philipsajet.com

Biography
Philip Sajet was born in the Netherlands in 1953. His studies at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie, Amsterdam, were followed by an apprenticeship with Francesco Pavan in Padova, Italy. Over the years he has been invited to lecture at the most prestigious institutions worldwide. Philip currently lives and works between Germany and France.

Work
“I decided making Jewellery when the first snow fell in Amsterdam in 1977.
Since that day nothing has changed, I still always look to catch that elusive Beauty.”

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Architecture Open Lecture Series to host five acknowledged architects during Autumn semester

Department of Architecture and Urban Design of the Estonian Academy of Arts is happy to present the Open Lecture Series lineup for the autumn semester – a number of exciting architects, urban planners, academics from across the world. The lectures are free of charge, in English, take place every fortnight, and are open to everyone – for both students and professionals of the field, general audience and students considering architecture for their further studies.

Opening the season on the 5th of October at 6 pm will be Enric Ruiz-Geli, Spanish architect whose innovative practices in the field of building energy efficiency, climate change led changes to construction and understanding of a building on a molecular level have inspired the world for nearly a quarter of a century. Ruiz-Geli was designing bio-architecture already ten years ago, and has – unlike most – had his designs also built: his office building in Barcelona has an inflatable smart facade to regulate sunlight and temperature reaching the interior of the building. At present, Ruiz-Geli is co-operating with Ferran Adria and El Bulli, one of the most innovative restaurants in the world, currently being transformed into a scientific research institute for food – the goal being that the building to house the research for the future of food should also represent the future of architecture.

On the 19th of October at 6 pm, the next speaker in the series will step on stage at Kanuti Gildi SAAL, our usual venue for the lectures. In his research, Daniel Köhler focuses on mereology of cities – meaning, how particles form a whole in the example of cities, making this a lecture that in addition to architects should definitely capture the attention of urbanists.

Arriving to Tallinn on the 2nd of November is architect and artist Didier Faustino, who is focused on how people relate to space and creates human-scale spaces – Faustino’s spatial installations are especially well known: he’s designed striking temporary stages that invite people to perform and speak up, as well as created spatial installation projects for exhibitions, asking questions about the sense of a space. This is a lecture that sculpture, installation, spatial design and interior architecture students, lecturers and audience should definitely not miss.

The fourth speaker of the Autumn semester is Matthias Rippmann – member of the team led by ETH Zurich researchers that constructed the Armadillo Vault – an expansive canopy using 399 slabs of limestone and no glue – for the 2016 Venice biennale main exhibition. Rippmann’s lecture in Tallinn on the 11th of November will also revolve around innovative new uses of limestone in architecture, making this a lecture interesting for architects as well as interior architects, designers and material researchers.

To finish the Autumn lecture series, on 14th of December is architect Artem Kitaev from KOSMOS architecture office. Originating from Moscow, Kitaev is working with a team based now in Moscow, Basel, New York and Bangkok. KOSMOS works across typologies and on different scales – from door handles to the city, from earnest architecture to temporary installations. KOSMOS, in their own words, combines art with technology, global experience with respect towards local context and European professionalism with Russian passion.

Schedule:
05.10.2017 7 pm – Enric Ruiz-Geli
19.10.2017 7 pm – Daniel Köhler
02.11.2017 7 pm – Didier Fiuza Faustino
16.11.2017 7 pm – Matthias Rippmann
14.12.2017 7 pm – Artem Kitaev

The architecture and urban planning department of the Estonian Academy of Arts has been curating the Open Lectures on Architecture series since 2012 – each year, a dozen architects, urbanists, both practicing as well as academics, introduce their work and field of research to the audience in Tallinn. All lectures are in English, free and open to all interested.

The series is funded by the Estonian Cultural Endowment
Curators: Sille Pihlak, Siim Tuksam
www.avatudloengud.ee
https://www.facebook.com/EKAarhitektuur/

More info:
Pille Epner
E-mail: arhitektuur@artun.ee
Tel. +372 642 0071

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13.09–30.09.2017. Whispering Stones. Khurtova & Bourlanges.

Elena Khurtova & Marie Bourlanges present an interactive sound installation “Whispering Stones” inspired by a peculiar text dedicated to the star constellation of Cephea. Playing with the double etymology of Cephea as “stone” and “head”, the duo explores the fictional narratives superimposed on natural elements like stones, and attempt to give them back their own “voice”. Referring to ritual practices with healing stones found in the Cévennes region of France, Khurtova and Bourlanges experiment with touching over recreated stones, enabling them to “speak”.

Playing with the acoustic and spacious quality of the exhibition space in dialogue with the tactility of porcelain pieces, the installation will generate an immersive sound and visual experience. “Cephea’s chanting stones” is part of the fourth chapter of Khurtova & Bourlanges’ current project “the Sky is on the Earth” based on the archive of Jacques Bourlanges, connecting star constellations and land geography.

This project is made possible with the support of Mondriaan Fund and Stichting Stokroos.

Guided tour on 26th of September at 7.30 pm, the event is part of Tallinn Tuesday programme.

www.theskyisontheearth.com

Event is produced by Tallinn Architecture Biennale. Supporters: French Institute, Beweship Eesti, EKA Gallery

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INTERIOR ARCHITECTS OF EUROPEAN STATES GATHER IN PÄRNU, ESTONIA TO DISCUSS THE FUTURE OF OUR LIVING ENVIRONMENT, SPATIAL DESIGN AND THE EDUCATION CHARTER

On 8th and 9th september, interior architects and designers from European countries will convene in Pärnu, Estonia to discuss the current issues surrounding our living space and to set new directions to enhance the profession as well as unify its standards across the European Union. Pärnu Rannahotell (Beach Hotel), designed by Anton Soans and Olev Siinmaa in 1935-37, is now one of the functionalist style landmarks and cultural heritage sites of Estonia. The picturesque beachside hotel, recently renovated according to the plans of the newly elected Chairman of the Board for the Estonian Association of Interior Architects, Pille Lausmäe, is thus a perfectly selected site to host the General Assembly of the European Council of Interior Architects (ECIA) — the event will draw in about a hundred leading interior architecture and design professionals from all of Europe.

“Estonia is one of the younger members of the ECIA and marks the Eastern border of Europe. There is a lot of great development in the interior architecture and design field within Estonia and the national organisation, the ESL is very active. This in combination with the fact that Estonia, to many of the representatives of our members, will be new and unknown prompted our decision to have our general assembly and the celebration of our 25th birthday event in Estonia,” says the President of ECIA, Anja Dirks (NL).

ECIA Board seats Tüüne-Kristin Vaikla (PhD) from Estonia who is the single representative in ECIA leadership from the Baltic and Nordic countries as well as the eastern side of Europe.

“I am very happy that we have raised interest in Estonia with our professional activities and now the top interior architects of Europe will gather here during Estonian Presidency of Europe. With the ECIA General Assembly events we will have the opportunity to introduce inspiring sites and spaces in Pärnu and Tallinn. With its strong interior architecture education – both old and new traditions – Estonia has surfaced as an example to International colleagues,” says Tüüne-Kristin Vaikla, who herself, as the first Estonian interior architect, defended her doctoral thesis at the Estonian Academy of Arts in the current year. Her interest is to develop a more academic and research based approach in the profession, being one of the initiators and curators of SISU – Symposium of Interior Architecture and Spatial Use.

The Estonian Association of Interior Architects has been organising the International symposium for four years and the news of its success have spread across the world. As a result, SISU (which means CONTENT/the CORE in Estonian) was invited to Switzerland by Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Art / Institute of Interior Architecture, and the Association of Swiss Interior Architects. Estonia also has quite a rare international interior architecture master curriculum at the Estonian Academy of Arts, which has gained worldwide attention with its inspiring projects.
The European Council of Interior Architects, celebrating its 25th anniversary at the General Assembly, is the representative body for the European professional organisations in Interior Architecture and Design. Founded in 1992, ECIA currently represents 17 members-national organizations, with over 6000 professionals Interior Architects/Designers.
ECIA provides a common platform for the exchange of information on best professional practice. The ECIA has been established to found a European network to intensify the European network for interior architects/designers and to constantly develop and intensify the profession. This is done by an intensive communication about the profession and sharing views and a permanent dialogue with the members, partners, and sister organisations, institutions and the European parliament itself. One of its tasks is to endorse minimal common standards of education and a professional profile for the associated interior architects/designers of the member organisations.
The programme of the General Assembly and symposium in Pärnu will involve presentations from leading interior architects and space professionals as well as tours of the award-winning sites, eg Urbancows, Hedon Spa, Villa Pärnu, Pärnu Beach Stadium Building and ohter interesting buildings and interiors.

Lecturers:
Anja Dirks, ECIA president (The Netherlands)
Margit Aule, KAOS Architects (Estonia)
Sabine Keggenhoff, Keggenhoff + Partner (Germany)
Ricardo López Mosteiro (Spain)
Gabriel-Ionuț Mândrișcanu (Romania)
Hugo de Jager, Revelating (The Netherlands)
Katelijn Quartier, PhD, Retail Design Lab, (Belgium)

There will also be a presentation of the newly published SISU__LINE #3, a scholarly publication of the EAIA.

SISU_LINE #3 Editor in Chief is Tüüne-Kristin Vaikla, Editor Eva Näripea. Contributors: Alari Allik, Eva Storgaard, Gerrit Schilder & Hill Scholte, Monica Knoll, Eva Sepping, Cynthia Madansky, Ingel Vaikla. The collection of texts includes an interview by Pille Lausmäe with Jüri Kermik as well as summaries of the Estonian Academy of Arts interior architecture master theses 2016.

ECIA thanks its supporters:

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Join practical STARTERcreative idea development programme (2study points), that starts 19th of September

Come and join the STARTERcreative idea development programme (in English)!

The program designed by five Estonian universities will help your team with all the basic entrepreneurship skills (business development, service design/product development, marketing, business model generation, sales, pitching). You’ll get from idea to business model in no time. The teams will be formed in the first lecture.

Program begins on the 19th of September and lasts for 3 months. Participation is free of charge and no previous knowledge of entrepreneurship is required. Find out more about the program and register at: www.starteridea.ee

Sessions take place at different universities in the city centre and begin at 17:00 (duration 2,5 hours). All the workshop activities are done on the spot, so there will be no additional responsibilites in between sessions. Participants will also receive a certificate or a diploma after the program. For the best teams access for advanced programs (incubators, accelerators) will be provided. And yes, there a cash prizes as well.

Find the program schedule here: http://starteridea.ee/STARTERcreative/

Contact:

Kelli Turmann, kelli.turmann@artun.ee, 6267345
Estonia pst 7 ruum 512.

STARTERcreative is a part of the entrepreneurial development programme Edu ja Tegu (http://ettevotlusope.edu.ee) and it is co-funded by EU Social Fund

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CITY UNFINISHED CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS ONLINE

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CONFERENCE:

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Bordering Affects: International Workshop in Narva, 7-9th Sep 2017

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Bordering Affects: International Workshop in Narva, 7-9th Sep 2017

The Bordering Affects workshop invites participants for a reflection on how the frontier is embodied and the affective constellations that it generates. The programme is composed of a series of talks, workshops and excursions aimed at exploring localised attunements, past presences and everyday intensities of Narva. By reflecting on idiosynchratic practices and sensibilities, and their potential of contagion, this international workshop is meant to acquaint us with invisible subjectivities of the place and alleviate negative stereotypes, turning the Estonian society more inclusive and more considerate of differences.

Narva is one of the oldest borders of Europe; however, as a city, it has been under construction for over a century, showing today an active negotiation of belonging and generating distinct attachments in multiple scales and temporalities. In Narva, the river functions as a geopolitical border, but the bordering affect goes beyond the line. Life at the edge produces a particular regime of knowledge and sense of belonging, generating distinct intensities, delineations and cultural practices. And yet, Narva is more than a geopolitical node and a periphery; it is a centre out there, a historical site with heightened symbolic, industrial, military, architectural, environmental and spiritual value. Also a mystery charged with multiple potentials.

Most of the programme is intended for Urban Studies and Interior Architecture/Spatial Design students. Participating students are invited to excavate in their experience and to build knowledge based in their situated affects for producing an empathic outcome of their time in Narva. They will work in groups of five and present in our last day there their works meant to reflect on the distinct intensities and attunements of Narva through the prisms of affect, resonance, contagion and embodied imagination. Accordingly, they are expected to acquaint with the distinct states of mind generated in the Narvian environment.

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EVENT OPEN FOR PUBLIC: Friday, 8th of September

Venue: Narva College

  • 16:00 Public discussion with Ivan Sergejev, Aet Kiisla, Lorraine Weekes, Tarmo Pikner, and the Palestinians professors Shaden S. Awad, Dima Yaser and Yasid Elrifai, moderated by FM. Narva College, room no 100

Being in-between times and spaces: the public discussion sets up to engage with how borders destabilise any easy distinction between ‘local’ and ‘global’ and the way they generate concrete emotional outcomes. We will also discuss the ambivalences of borderlands, the particular quotidian practices, tastes and material culture that appear in situ, its hybrid or plural identity making, and how borderlands might become a centre out there.

Organisers:
Departments of Urban Studies and Interior Architecture/Spatial Design

Francisco Martinez
Keiti Kljavin
Andra Aaloe
Hannes Praks
Alina Nurmist


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Our Senior Researcher-Lecturer-Alumna Reet Aus among TOP 20 Responsible Leaders of Europe once again!

Our Senior Researcher, lecturer, alumna Reet Aus is among the TOP 20 Responsible Leaders of Europe! Congratulations, Reet!

In addition to Reet Aus, two other Estonians have been selected: Rasmus Rask from LaMuu organic ice cream and Robert Kitt from Swedbank Estonia.

Read about the ranking

8. Reet Aus

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Follow the construction of the EAA new building on webcam!

We can keep up with the construction progress via webcam on this link: http://veebikaamera.ee/Kotzebue_1.html

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ESTONIAN INTENSIVE LANGUAGE COURSE      1-18.08.2017

The Estonian intensive language course (ESTILC) took place 1-18.08.2017 and was organised for incoming ERASMUS+ students. The course was funded by Archimedes Foundation 

During 3 weeks students had versatile language courses taught by the energetic and lovely Vilma Lang who has given language classes in EAA already over 10 years. After language classes different cultural activities were organised. The students had the possibility to explore Old Town, Paljassaare, Kumu art museum, Pääsküla bog, Open Air museum and other places in Tallinn. During the trip to Pärnu the students participated in the festival Sleepless in August and got the chance to experience the summer capital of Estonia. 

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Summer School 5th Season Wilderness: VEETEE

In August 2016, a group of students from architecture, design and art universities in the Cirrus network spent 10 days in a summer workshop in Soomaa forests, Estonia, studying the unique context of the area, where the landscape is severely altered by flooding rivers at least once a year. Tutored by architect and artist Sami Rintala (Finland), architect Pavle Stamenovic (Serbia) and Estonian architecture office b210, students built three floating structures – a shelter, a fireplace and a sauna – as a response to the changing and challenging environment of the area.

Two of the three objects have now been opened to the public as part of local forest infrastructure, testing how experimental forest infrastructure could provide for the needs of people living in the area or visiting it. However, one of the structures – the sauna – did not persist the testing, and sunk to the watery depths.

Why build on water? Professor Hannes Praks, head of the Estonian Academy of Arts Interior Architecture department explains: “Wet areas are, recreationally speaking, extremely charming due to the high number of species and unique landscape, but at the same time hard to explore, both in the sense of getting there and staying. VEETEE (in English: Water Way), being located in an area that regularly floods and shifts, develops this competency, exploring ways of being both a transport vehicle and a usable space.”

Praks explains the drive for a workshop taking place on the edge of swamps and bogs: “The Wilderness Summer School was born out of the worldwide success of the forest megaphones project. I’ve personally always liked forest infrastructure, huts and paths etc and I believe these small scale wooden infrastructure projects will continue to be our focus and strength for the near term future.”

One of the tutors, Sami Rintala puts the learning and building process in wilderness in wider context: “As an attempt to deal with contemporary challenges, both planetary and local, it is necessary and clever to jump outside the usual game and stratagem of the urban professional life, and seek a counter-phenomena out on the ‘edge’, where people are ripped off from their roles and positions, and need to act on a common ground. People’s real needs emerge, and they need to be fulfilled, and meanwhile ‘design’ becomes just part of ‘making’.”

The wooden installation will be a part of larger network of forest infrastructure organized by the State Forest Management Centre of Estonia, similar to the forest megaphones Ruup, built by students last year.

Soomaa is a mixture of boglands and meandering rivers that flood over seasonally, mostly in spring, when the water raises several meters higher for weeks. The water flows over flood-plain grasslands and forests and covers fields, forests and roads, disrupting connection with the rest of the world. Locals and visitors use boats to navigate the altered territory, but the students took up the challenge to see what types of floating space they could create, responding to the needs of people in the area.

Materials: timber (spruce), metal barrels, metal strapping tape, screws

Dimensions: 3.8m (L) x 3.8m (W) x 2.7m (H, from keel to top)

Weight: approx. 700 kg (approx. 1540 lbs)

Location: https://goo.gl/maps/U2D8VN5fayL2

Website: https://www.ekasisearhitektuur.ee/projects/veetee/

Blog: http://wildernesssummerschool.tumblr.com/

Tutors:

Sami Rintala (Finland)
Pavle Stamenovic (Serbia)
b210 architects (Estonia)
Hannes Praks (Estonia)

Students:

Alden Jõgisuu, Andrea Tamm, Andres Mutis, Berglind Erna Tryggvadóttir, Brigita Kasperaitè, Dan Theman Docherty, Finlay Barge, Gabriel Müller, Gerda Kaasik, Kadri Erdel, Kristiina Veinberg, Laura Müürsepp, Siim Karro, Stefano Prevosti, Triin Mänd, Tuva Ina Sofia Björk

Supporters: Pärlin, Karula Puit, Espak Viljandi, Viljandi Metall, Viljandi Kaminakoda, Hansaflex, Würth, RMK, Ants Viljandi, Eesti Kultuurkapital, Dag Reklaam, Liviko, Ramsi Turvas


To sign up and hear about how and when to apply for the international Summer School next session, sign up for our department’s newsletter here

Additional information:

Hannes Praks

Head of the Interior Architecture Department

hannes.praks@artun.ee

+372 527 3626

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Summer School 5th Season: Wilderness 2016: VEETEE

In August 2016, a group of students from architecture, design and art universities in the Cirrus network spent 10 days in a summer workshop in Soomaa forests, Estonia, studying the unique context of the area, where the landscape is severely altered by flooding rivers at least once a year. Tutored by architect and artist Sami Rintala (Finland), architect Pavle Stamenovic (Serbia) and Estonian architecture office b210, students built three floating structures – a shelter, a fireplace and a sauna – as a response to the changing and challenging environment of the area.

Two of the three objects have now been opened to the public as part of local forest infrastructure, testing how experimental forest infrastructure could provide for the needs of people living in the area or visiting it. However, one of the structures – the sauna – did not persist the testing, and sunk to the watery depths.

Why build on water? Professor Hannes Praks, head of the Estonian Academy of Arts Interior Architecture department explains: “Wet areas are, recreationally speaking, extremely charming due to the high number of species and unique landscape, but at the same time hard to explore, both in the sense of getting there and staying. VEETEE (in English: Water Way), being located in an area that regularly floods and shifts, develops this competency, exploring ways of being both a transport vehicle and a usable space.”

Praks explains the drive for a workshop taking place on the edge of swamps and bogs: “The Wilderness Summer School was born out of the worldwide success of the forest megaphones project. I’ve personally always liked forest infrastructure, huts and paths etc and I believe these small scale wooden infrastructure projects will continue to be our focus and strength for the near term future.”

One of the tutors, Sami Rintala puts the learning and building process in wilderness in wider context: “As an attempt to deal with contemporary challenges, both planetary and local, it is necessary and clever to jump outside the usual game and stratagem of the urban professional life, and seek a counter-phenomena out on the ‘edge’, where people are ripped off from their roles and positions, and need to act on a common ground. People’s real needs emerge, and they need to be fulfilled, and meanwhile ‘design’ becomes just part of ‘making’.”

The wooden installation will be a part of larger network of forest infrastructure organized by the State Forest Management Centre of Estonia, similar to the forest megaphones Ruup, built by students last year.

Soomaa is a mixture of boglands and meandering rivers that flood over seasonally, mostly in spring, when the water raises several meters higher for weeks. The water flows over flood-plain grasslands and forests and covers fields, forests and roads, disrupting connection with the rest of the world. Locals and visitors use boats to navigate the altered territory, but the students took up the challenge to see what types of floating space they could create, responding to the needs of people in the area.

Additional information:
Hannes Praks
Head of the Interior Architecture Department
hannes.praks@artun.ee
+372 527 3626

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Photo Gallery of the cornerstone event for the EAA new building

Photos by Tõnu Tunnel

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THE 2017 APPLIED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS COMPETITION, DEADLINE 8 SEPTEMBER

Each year, the Estonian Academy of Arts Department of Research and Development, in conjunction with the Tallinn City Enterprise Department, holds an Applied Research and Development Projects Competition aimed at motivating the Academy’s members to apply to a greater extent the results of their academic and research activity in the public, business and third sectors, raise the quality of the know-how provided by the Academy to companies and the public, and to raise public awareness of the application of the Academy’s knowhow in the economy and society.

The competition will determine the work with the most outstanding economic effects with regard to generating benefits to one or more companies or institution (800-euro prize), and the work with the most outstanding potential with regard to bettering social well-being and/or the living environment (800-euro prize). In addition, a special prize of 600 euros has been instituted. It can be awarded in either category to a worthy runner-up.

The members of this year’s competition jury are Jaanus Vahesalu of the Tallinn City Enterprise Department; Maria Jäärats and Kelli Turmann from the Estonian Academy of Arts Department of Research and Development; Sille Pihlak from the Faculty of Architecture; and a teacher from the Academy’s Design and Engineering speciality, Ruth-Helene Melioranski. Changes may be made to the jury members if the entries include work by any of their students.

The competition is well-suited to Academy of Arts students whose final thesis has attained applied output – where the result of the work may be commercialized or used in other organizations.

To enter a work in the competition, a completed form along with the additional materials specified on the form must be sent by email to kelli.turmann@artun.ee by 

8 September 2017, the subject including the word “Competition” and the name of the author. The e-mail addresses of all who participated in the conducting the work must be included among the e-mail recipients.

DOWNLOAD COMPETITION PROCEDURE AND ENTRY FORM  HEREapplication

The jury will review the materials and select a winner by 22 September 2017. The award for effect on business activity will be handed out at an award ceremony taking place at Tallinn Entrepreneurship Day in early October.

The competition is co-financed by the Tallinn Enterprise Department

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Birgit Saviauk – young talent of Mittelmoda

Fashion designer Birgit Saviauk has won a special price for the use of technolocial techniques in the well known Italian fashion contest Mittelmoda. The supervisior of the master’s thesis “Experimental surfaces and color changing fibers – knitwear for men” was Prof. Piret Puppart (MA).

The 24th International Lab of Mittelmoda- Fashion Award 2017 was designed to give young talents an opportunity to introduce their innovative solutions at the fashion world of Milan and to provide support for fresh ideas.

There were 23 collections of talented designeres from different countries at the international competition. The four special prizes were awarded by the IEG Italian Exhibition Group and Origin – Passion and Beliefs.

Created in 1993, Mittelmoda is one of the oldest and most respected international fashion competitions for young talents. 

More info at: https://blog.trendstop.com/2017/06/international-lab-of-mittelmoda-2017/

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Anu Rieberg – grand prix in fashion competition “Pecherski KasHtany”

“Pecherski Kashtany” is an international competition for young designers of costume. The 17th competition took place in Kiev. 

Anu Rieberg, who showed her collection “Followed It” won a first place in Pret-A-Porter category. The winner also received an intensive course at the Paris Fashion Studio summer school. 

The competition organized by the Kyiv National University of Technologies and Design included participants from Ukraine, Baltic States and other European countries. There were several different categories in the competition: Pret-A-Porter, Pret-A-Porter de lux, Special (footwear), Pro Art and Folk.

More information: https://www.facebook.com/pecherskie.kashtany/

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Final destination

On Thursday, June 8, 2017 graduating fashion designers of Estonian Academy of Arts will meet for one day at ISFAG to present their fashion collections as exhibits, catwalk and performance.

11 designers creations are curatored by Rauno Zubko. Dj Martin Aedla, Abramova and Ketomees are playing the vinyls.

The final collections are shown by: EVGENIYA DOLGOPOLOVA, KRISTIINA JEROMANS, FRIDA JÕE, KRISTEL KUSLAPUU, EVA MARIA KÕRVAS, VEERA LUSTINA, MERLIS ORION, ANU RIEBERG, LIISBET SAUE, ELISABETTA SILVERSTI and TAURI VÄSTRIK.

8 designers of 11 showed their collections at ERKI fashion show, where Frida Jõe won the ERKI Grand Prix, Evgeniya Dolgopolova won a PÖFF special prize, Elisabetta Silvestri won a special prize to participate in the Moscow Fashion Week show “Russian Silhouette” and Tauri Västrik got a opportunity to travel to London where he gets a short course in the prestigious Central Saint Martins. In addition to the ERKI fashion show, Anu Rieberg attended the international fashion show “Pecherski Kashtany” held in Kiev, where she won the first place in the “pret-a-porter” category.

Kristel Kuslapuu, last fall nominee for the golden needel in Tallinn Fashion Week, also will show her latest creations. For the first time, Liisbet Saue and Veera Lustina, will show their collections.

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Experimental forms in the KUMU Art Museum

The experimental form exhibition ”Pulss” (Pulse) is exhibited in the pedestrian tunnel of KUMU Art Museum May 20 – June 20, 2017.

The core of the exhibition is the play of experimental forms and non-traditional materials in a utopian and fantasy way. The source of the exhibit is red carpet that is known from fashion shows and gala’s.

Experimental forms were completed in the master class under the supervison of the fashion designer Liisi Eesmaa. Feeling the borders of the material and red color and also blood circulation created a new and never ending reality. This kind of exhibition format is a first timer in KUMU Art Museum.

The Marit Illison and Liisi Eesmaa courses have already become a tradition. The forms of previous years were born from plastic pipes, plywood and paper as well as old posters, proving that creative ideas have the vitality to grow on the most unusual ground.

Creative leader and stylist of the exhibition: Liisi Eesmaa

Designers: Kristin Sigus, Emma Leoni, Edvard Hiietam, Külli-Triin Laanet, Karita Kärmet, Hannes Rüütel, Kreet Kärner, Nele Kurvits, Beatrice Randkivi, Lotte Raisch, Andreas Kübar

Photos: Riina Varol

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/261878530952419/?active_tab=about

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Exhibition Kittel ja põll (Smock and Apron) in the TV Tower

On the 17th of May Teletorns panoramic floor will open a new exhibition called “Kittel ja põll”.

The display will return us to Soviet Union. Already the third exhibition of Estonian Academy of Arts fashion department, but this time the clothing of a socialist time housewife will gain the limelight. 

“In fashion history, the most prominent themes are haute couture or avant garde. But what did our mothers and grandmothers wore on daily basis in the 80’s in Estonia?” is the question asked by fashion students of the II course. 

Nostalgia brings us back to the deficient 80’s and makes us recall the times when there was nothing available. As clothes were hard to get, the smock was a life savior, it could wear, smear and tear. But this didn’t mean that it was just a boring garment at home. The few opportunities that women had lit up their creativity and sense of fashion. The simple fabrics were decorated with commercially available lace, colored garments and plastic buttons.

We also recall the aprons that were used to sweep clean jam mouths and dirty hands. We bring multicolored patterns, bold color combinations and ingenious design ideas to the viewers, that are still in the back of our closets thanks to our mothers and grandmothers.

The exhibition remains open til the 1st of October in the TV Tower.

The exhibiton was organized by Estonian Academy of Arts fashion deparment students: Kertu Kivisik, Sirli Pohlak, Kaia Kuusmann, Pamela Põld, Mari-Ly Kapp, Sandra Luks, Kerttu Reinmaa, Aleksanda Tšusovljanova Närjanen, Kätilin Haak, Sirli Lehtsalu

Lector and curator: Maiu Rõõmus

Photographer: Oliver Moosus

Make-up: Mari-Ly Kapp

We thank costume rental “Maiu Mood” and all the people who helped with the historical pieces: Maiu Rõõmus, Helinde Mäeots, Maila Kasepõld, Rita Riisalu, Kati Kuusmann, Krista Kilter, Karin Lood, Helgi Kokk, Juta Kokk, Laura Raudkivi, Piret Puppart, Mare Mikita, Milvi Pohlak, Triin Tint, Airi Gailit, Piia Kivisik, Leili Tali, Ave Härg, Linda Lääts, Urve Kivonogova, Marilin Assafrei, Maret Assafrei, Edvard Hiietam, Klaara Kaarlõpp, Vilma Kivimägi, Elle, Evi Hütt, Sirli Laanesaar, Piret Tegova, Svetlana Tšusovljanova, Olga Tšusovljanova, Kaleria Istomina, Aliide Madi, Hilje Murdla, Sirli Laanemets, Kristi Gutham

Special thanks: Stella firma, Solveig Jahnke, TV Tower, EKA fashion department and TTHK.

http://www.teletorn.ee/event/naeitus-noukogude-naise-kitlid-ja-polled/

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CITY UNFINISHED: International Conference in City Planning

CITY UNFINISHED: International Conference in City Planning
30th August 2017, Kanuti Gildi SAAL (Pikk 20, Tallinn)

Every decision has a spatial dimension, an impact and a consequence apparent in the future. To a large degree, cities are a result of decisions from a broad spectrum of disciplines and ongoing processes. We seek to explore who are steering us towards these results and how is the future shaped, or what we want from a future city.

At the conference, we will ask:
*How do different practices construct futures?
*Are long term strategic plans plausible and possible or have we shifted towards swift tactical decisionmaking?
*If cities offer a high quality of life for the whole society, then who in particular? Who do we negotiate this with?
*How do we plan the indeterminable? Can one perceive the future by rolling dice?
*How do we enact the future? Can it be pre-determined – drawn up, described, scheduled and ruled?

There’s no participation fee for the conference, but we kindly ask you to register at goo.gl/nroFpb

PRESENTERS:

THOMAS AUER started his career in 1994 shortly after Transsolar was founded and his outstanding engineering aptitude and leadership qualities brought him onto the management board of the company in 2000. Based on his deep understanding of integrated building systems and energy efficiency in buildings, Thomas has developed energy and building service concepts for projects around the world noted for their innovative design and energy performance. His concepts are an integral part of signature architecture. Thomas has collaborated with world known architects on numerous international design projects and competitions. His projects have become milestones in the history of the company, as KfW Bank in Frankfurt, Lycée Charles de Gaulle in Damascus. Manitoba Hydro, an office tower in downtown Winnipeg Canada, is considered one of the most energy efficient high rise buildings in North America.

MARKUS SCHAEFER (MSc, MArch, SIA) has a Masters of Architecture from Harvard University. In addition, he also has a Masters in Neurobiology from the University of Zürich. At Harvard, he first collaborated with his current partner Hiromi Hosoya on the Harvard Guide to Shopping, edited by Rem Koolhaas et al. and published by Taschen in 2001. Prior to founding Hosoya Schaefer, Markus Schaefer was a director of AMO in Rotterdam. AMO is the think tank and research department of OMA, the architecture office established by Rem Koolhaas. Both with work at OMA and at Hosoya Schaefer, Markus Schaefer has won several international awards. He lectures and publishes regularly. He is also partner and head of research at CityTrackerX AG, a privately funded research and development company aiming at a real-time performance analysis of cities.

JOHANNES KUEHN founded Kuehn Malvezzi in Berlin in 2001 together with Simona Malvezzi and Wilfried Kuehn. Since 2016, he is professor for building construction and design at Bauhaus University Weimar. Exhibitions and museums are a focus in the work of Kuehn Malvezzi and more generally a point of departure in their design strategies: at all scales, from exhibition design to the city, they follow a curatorial approach to architecture. Kuehn Malvezzi realized the architectural design for Documenta 11, the Flick Collection in the Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin as well as the Julia Stoschek Collection in Dusseldorf, which was nominated for the international Mies van der Rohe award. The firm has designed the reorganization of a number of art collections, such as the Museum Belvedere in Vienna and the Herzog Anton Ulrich Museum in Brunswick. The curatorial approach to urban architecture and public spaces are a second focus of the practice. Kuehn Malvezzi won the international competition for the interreligious House of One on the historic foundations of Berlin’s earliest churches at Petriplatz in 2012. Being a significant element of the city, housing projects have become more and more important for Kuehn Malvezzi in the recent years. In 2017 the practice completed Villengärten am Relenberg – a new residential neighbourhood in Stuttgart and is currently working on housing projects in Mainz and Baden-Baden. Kuehn Malvezzi’s critical approach to reconstruction shown in their entry for the Humboldt-Forum competition won the special prize and was also awarded with the 2009 German Critics’ Prize in the architecture category. Their projects have been shown in numerous international exhibitions, including the 14th Architecture Biennial in Venice and the 1st Chicago Architecture Biennial in 2015.

DOUGLAS GORDON is an architect and spatial planner. He was educated at the Bartlett, UCL and worked for nearly 15 years in urban planning in London with major projects on Covent Garden, Kings Cross, and Camden Town regeneration, before deciding to come and live in Helsinki with his family. Douglas works for the City of Helsinki’s Environmental Services department where he has responsibility for coordinating EU urban projects such as the Helsinki-Tallinn-St Petersburg Spatial Vision, North South Interface, and the Helsinki-Paris Location Dynamics and Clusters formation research. Currently Douglas works on the Baltic Space 2050 project with Stockholm and Tallinn as well as the NSB CoRe EU spatial planning project for the North Sea Baltic core regions. Douglas oversees international planning affairs for the City’s new City Plan and recently contributed to many core issues on the Plan, including reports on Transnational Helsinki, Urbanism, Social Cohesion, the new City Plan brochure and other key strategic elements for the City Plan. Douglas has been involved with Tallinn and the Academy of Arts over many years, including the new spatial planning competition for the Port.

***

“City, Unfinished” is a research project initiated by the Estonian Academy of Arts Faculty of Architecture with the support of E.L.L Real Estate. Invited researchers and specialists alongside faculty members, researcher fellows and doctoral students will look into the spatial scenarios and visions for future urban developments exemplified on Tallinn, the capital of Estonia.

The research focuses on six major topics: planning practices, structure of the urban fabric, density, the border of the city and large scale infrastructure. A core group of five researchers will dedicate half a year to each of these topics. Next to the research an international professional workshop with invited guests is held and parallel student courses are tackling similar problematics at the faculty of Architecture and City planning, and the department of Urban Studies. The three year research project will kick off with an opening conference and conclude in a book and exhibition, accompanied by a final, international conference addressing the wider public and professionals.

Estonian Academy of Arts Faculty of Architecture research project THE UNFINISHED CITY is made possible through the partnership with E.L.L Real Estate and in collaboration with Tallinn Municipality.

Facebook event

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2017

Tüüne-Kristin Vaikla

Re-purposing Space: the Role and Potential of Spatial Intervention

(Ruumi ümbermõtestamine. Ruumilise sekkumise roll ja võimalus)

Supervisors: prof dr Ranulph Glanville ja prof dr Mart Kalm (Estonian Academy of Arts)

Pre-reviewers: dr Suzie Attiwill (RMIT) and dr Lilian Hansar (Estonian Academy of Arts)

Opponent: prof Morten Lund (Chalmers University of Technology)

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17.08–9.09.2017.IN BETWEEN LOOPS. SUSANNA FLOCK

On 17 August at 18.00 EKA Galerii invites you to the opening of the first show of this season, “In between loops” by Susanna Flock.

The exhibition includes a selection of Susanna Flocks recent works and new works derived from her current research into the relationship between the body and its technologically- mediated environment. An integral part of her artistic work is a mode of practice coined by experimental strategies and a conceptual approach. Art as a medium of communication and the examination of the impact of digitalization on cultural production, outreach and reception form the thematic basis.

Susanna Flock (born 1988) is consistently working on conceptual issues which are implemented in different media. A particular experimental approach in dealing with the medium of video takes on a central role. In 2015 she graduated in Fine Arts/Experimental Design at the University of Art in Linz, Austria. Susanna Flock has participated in numerous exhibitions and screenings in selected venues, among others, in Vienna, Leipzig, Tallinn, Vigo, Zurich, Toronto, Frankfurt, Wroclaw and Sao Paulo. She also won several prices, i.e. the Henkel Art.Award. (2010), the Ö1 talent scholarship for visual arts (2011), the Crossing Europe Innovative Award – Local Artist (2017). She was an artist-in-residence in Zagreb, Croatia in 2015 (Styria-Artist-In-Residence), Kristiansand, Norway in 2016 (Creart) and in Wroclaw, Poland 2017 (cooperation WRO Art Center and St.A.i.R.). She lives and works in Vienna.
http://susannaflock.net/

The exhibition is open until 9 September.

The artist and the gallery would like to thank BKA Austria, Land Steiermark and Austrian Embassy in Tallinn

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Summer School FLOODED to open a floating sauna on 10th August in Soomaa!

The Estonian Academy of Arts Interior Architecture department’s international Summer School returned this summer for a second instalment, this time under the title FLOODED. Last year, the Summer School team ended up building floating object Veetee, a project that inspired minds far beyond Soomaa and Estonia. This year, our team of architecture and design students and tutors from the field built a floating sauna which will be opened for public on 10 August 2017 at 5 pm. The floating sauna will be anchored near the campfire site where Tõramaa River and Raudna River meet. The sauna ritual is intertwined with water – in this case, taking people directly onto the Soomaa streams which flood the roads, meadows and yards of Soomaa at least once a year, creating a new, unusual world. The sauna will be open for public use for travellers in the area after opening.

According to head of the interior architecture department Hannes Praks, a sauna makes a good research and design project for the architecture and design summer school, because sauna is layered and interesting space, covering architecture, interior architecture, constructional physics, climatic and cultural aspects. It’s also an excellent chance to introduce to the international team of the summer school a critically important spatial typology in Estonian culture.

Suvekooli FLOODED korraldab EKA sisearhitektuuri osakond koostöös Riigimetsa Majandamise Keskusega.

FLOODED is jointly organised by the Estonian Academy of Arts interior architecture department and Estonian Forest Management Centre.

Summer School tutors: b210 architects, Sami Rintala, Hannes Praks, Justin Tucker

Summer School participants: Fernanda Cabezas, Marie-Elise Chhabra, Fergal Clenaghan, Rasmus Exo, Sigrun Perla Gisladottir, Eetu Hyvönen, Zane Kalnina, Alexander Kamelhair, Laura Lammert, Johanne Kirketerp Nielsen, Sonia Sobrino Ralston, Lukas Scheidegger, Liina Soosaar, Gudmar Söderin, Asia Valencic, Wenzel Witt-Dörring

Support: Eesti Turbatooted, Liviko, RMK

The international summer school is taking place as part of the project entitled “Tallinn Summer Academy of Art, Design and Architecture – Edge/Blurring Boundaries”. The project has been made possible by 37,079.24 euros in funding from the European Regional Development Fund.

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Loomehäkk (hackathon) 8.-10.09. Free for students. Subject – creative spaces

Students join Creative Hack for free, get your ticket today

The biggest creative industry hackathon in the Baltic Sea Region is back again. Join us from 8-10th of September at the TLU Baltic Film and Media School and end your summer with a bang!

Set up your own team of creatives, code writers, designers, entrepreneurs and enthusiasts to bring your idea to life. Come and seek missing talents for your team. Join other hacking crews with soaring ideas. You will have the entire Baltic Film and Media School building, mentors (Microsoft, Jobbatical, Telliskivi Creative City, Hypester, Estonian Business Angels Network), equipment, practitioners, free meals, unshakeable WiFi and 48 hours at your disposal to build a unique solution and present it to the jury to compete for prizes.

The central theme of the 4th edition of Creative Hack/Loomehäkk is creative space in all its manifestations:

· VIRTUAL SPACE

· PLAYING SPACE

· CULTURAL SPACE

· SHOWROOM

· URBAN SPACE

You can join the event:

· with your team and/or idea

· by joining someone else’s team and/or idea

Food, sleeping arrangements, prizes: during the hackathon, teams will be provided with meals, snacks and drinks – so they could focus on the task at hand. If you’re out of town or just plain adventurous, you can sleep at the Baltic Film and Media School during the hackathon. And yes, there will be prizes, provided by our prestigious partners (check the list below) to reward the best teams for their valiant effort.

Event partners include: Digix, Edu & Tegu STARTER, Tallinn Business Incubators, Gamefounders, IGDA, Estonian Digital Centre, Enterprise Estonia, Microsoft, Tere AS, PÖFF, Telliskivi Creative City, Tallinn Music Week, Brand Manual, Estonian National Broadcasting, ESTBAN, Jobbatical, Fortumo, Protex, Veebimajutus.ee, Civitta, Tallinn University, Estonian Academy of Arts, Estonian Academy of Music and Theatre, Estonian Business School, Estonian Entrepreneurship University of Applied Sciences, European Union Social Fund.

Participation on the event is free of charge for students. Free participation is ensured by registering with the code LHtudeng at https://piletimasin.ee/en/loomehakk-vol-4-creative-spaces

Please bring you student ID to the event to verify your student status. For all others, early bird registration 15 euros until August 31, thereafter 25 euros.

To receive updates about the event, attend the Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1896426153937118/

Additional information: Marek Mühlberg, marekm@tlu.ee, +372 5510204

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The Estonian Academy of Arts launches its first international summer academy in 2017

The Tallinn Summer Academy of Art, Design and Architecture – Edge/Blurring Boundaries drew 183 applicants, of whom 77 have been chosen to participate.

The aim of the EAA Summer Academy is to contribute to fulfilling the mission, vision and internationalisation goals of the EAA – in other words, to be a central and internationally respected institution for creating, developing and studying art, visual culture and the living environment in Estonia as well as a key force for enriching the country’s cultural environment and quality of life.

According to Olivia Verev (of EAA’s Open Academy) who organised the academy, “The first International Summer Academy of Estonian Academy of Arts – Tallinn Summer Academy of Art, Design and Architecture received more applications than expected, which shows that EAA has expanded in a very important direction for the university. Tallinn Summer Academy enriches the international art, design and architecture education landscape by providing high-calibre opportunities for study and by introducing Estonian art, design and architecture internationally.”

Applications were received from 43 countries: Estonian, Finland, Germany, Poland, the United States, Lithuania, Latvia, Denmark, Austria, Iceland, Iran, Italy, China, Spain, Sweden, Egypt, Switzerland, Turkey, Russia, Mexico, Norway, Albania, Brazil, Netherlands, Ukraine, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Colombia, Czech, Chile, Nigeria, Hungary, Israel, Bulgaria, Greece, France, Portugal, United Kingdom, Palestine, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia, Croatia and Canada. Four of the course instructors are also from abroad. The 2017 courses will take place in August and include: Clay 3D Printing, Toys for Elephants, Telling Stories – Language in Video & Video as Language, Numbers and Cognition in the Urban Environment, The Contemporary Art Field in Estonia, and the FLOODED Summer School.

The international summer school is taking place as part of the project entitled “Tallinn Summer Academy of Art, Design and Architecture – Edge/Blurring Boundaries”. The project has been made possible by 37,079.24 euros in funding from the European Regional Development Fund.

Additional information: Olivia Verev, Project Manager for EAA’s Tallinn Summer School, 5806 6003, olivia.verev@artun.ee

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Tallinn Summer Academy 2017 is coming!

We are pleased to launch the first Tallinn Summer Academy of Art, Design and Architecture Edge/Blurring Boundaries! This year we have 6 different courses: Toys for Elephants, FLOODED Summer School, Numbers and Cognition in Urban Environment, Clay 3D Printing – Presence and Possibilities, Telling Stories – Language in Video and Video as a Language and Contemporary Art Field in Estonia. We are looking forward to meet all the participants in Tallinn! https://www.artun.ee/summeracademy/

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5.06–14.06.2017. Maybe, maybe not. EAA Graphic Design Department

We invite you to the exhibition of the students of the Department of Graphic Design of the Estonian Academy of Arts at EAA Gallery.
The exhibition displays the students’ installative works that unveil a fraction of their realities and guide the visitor’s attention to their personal perceptions.

It may be that we experience this exhibition identically – see the same colours, interpret words alike, sense every single detail similarly. Maybe, maybe not. Probably not.

Our realities are different, while at the same time forced to coexist and depend on each other. We might want everyone to live in our own ideal world. Perhaps they think it’s wrong. Perhaps I too, think it’s wrong. Maybe the path I’ve chosen doesn’t satisfy my needs and it may even be that everything else feels wrong to me as well.
But maybe everything is right.

Opening: 5.07, 19:00
Dates: 06.07–14.07
Location: EAA Gallery (Vabaduse väljak 6/8, Tallinn)
Open: Tu–Sat 12:00–18:00

Participants: Mai Bauvald, Kristjan Hinno, Mikk Tanel Oja, Marcus Pertel, Diandra Rebase, Ran-Re Reimann, Katarina Sarap, Robin Siimann, Joonas Timmi

Supervisors: Else Lagerspetz, Loore Sundja, Elisabeth Klement, Laura Pappa

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1. Semester: A Crash Course in Planning Practices

We have undertaken an ambitious task. To clarify in a short period of time how a city is planned. Which parties use what kind of instruments to make decisions concerning Tallinn? And as if the task itself wasn’t complex enough, we have also gathered comparative data from Helsinki, Riga, Copenhagen, Vilnius, Prague and Zurich. It is a crash course for us as well as for the people responsible for the various parts of the future research.
In selecting the sample, we considered cities comparable to Tallinn in size and recent history, but also some very different cities exemplary for other reasons. In practice, it means that we were in contact with various local practitioners, city officials, activists and theoreticians. We spoke with people, not institutions. We attempted to make our questions straightforward and understand what the success stories and problem areas in the given cities are. We asked if the planning of the given cities has been based on same wider visions. If there is some kind of a social contract in writing on how the city will develop and how the development will be gradually executed in various stages. We went to the offices of city architects to see what their daily work is like. What is the number of people working together with the city architect and what is his wider role in the society. The given discussions have largely been frank and personal. There has been little so-called official information. This allowed the interviewees to remain true to their opinions and also express criticism of the great success stories. We attempt to reveal the regulations and procedures behind the scenes that provide the city development with its framework, direction and ambition.
As we were probing the situation, we attempted to see and comprehend what the good living environment means in the 21st century and how to achieve it, what can be learned from whom, who are the important actors in the process of urban change and how they contribute. It turns out that the guiding principle of liveable Tallinn is, in fact, controversial – on the one hand, the concept of “the most liveable city” seems truly noble and attractive, on the other hand, the downside was described by Canadian architect Leonard Ma at the workshop “The Unfinished City” organised at the Faculty of Architecture. Originally from Vancouver, which is considered one of the most liveable cities graded high in various ‘liveable cities’ ranking lists, Leonard claimed that the downside of the given title is that due to the increased property prices, the locals cannot keep up with the pace and need to move. And the city is affordable only for the international business elite. For instance, the ranking table of the most liveable cities compiled by Mercer is primarily aimed at large corporations for smarter labour distribution. Then again, it would be absurd to claim that a liveable city is a bad goal, as there is nothing inherently wrong in the increase of property value. Quite the contrary. The question is how to create this value in the urban space in a stable and sustainable manner and not as an image-building project (to compare, the stable city of Zurich is ranked the second, while the brashly growing Dubai is ranked the 74th and Tallinn 89th in the table).
We have gathered and analysed a vast amount of material characterising the cities which allows us to compare the density and structure of living environments, the presence and structure of nature, transport networks and border areas, and to highlight the respective measurable and numeric data with the possible (in case of some cities, quite specific) future plans. In the course of the research, the analysis of the cities soon made it clear that the planning practices mainly differ from each other in nuances. Therefore, it would be reasonable to discuss and describe the cities through an overview of the discussions we had.

Johan Tali
Kalle Komissarov

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UMWELT – glass exhibition at the Adamson-Eric Museum

OMAILM / UMWELT
09. 06 – 01. 10. 2017
ADAMSON-ERICU MUSEUM
Curators Ülle Kruus & Mare Saare
Design Mari Kurismaa
Graphic design Külli Kaats
Artists:
1. 1967 Maie Mikof
2. 1970 Peeter Rudaš
3. 1975 Rait Prääts
4. 1979 Mare Saare
5. 1981 Eve Koha
6. 1985 Ivo Lill
7. 1995 BA Kai Kiudsoo-Värv 2005 MA
8. 1995 BA Tiina Sarapu 1996 MA
9. 1998 BA Eeva Käsper 2003 MA
10. 2002 BA Maret Sarapu 2005 MA
11. 2003 BA Kristiina Uslar 2007 MA
12. 2011 BA Andra Jõgis 2014 MA
13. 2013 BA Kristiina Oppi 2017 MA

Exhibition of glass at the Adamson-Eric Museum in Tallinn is dedicated to the 80th anniversary of the beginning of teaching art glass at the today’s Estonian Academy of Arts in 1936/37. The 13 artists represented have graduated from the academy during the last 50 years, both their final works – on b/w photographs – and latest creations are exhibited. The curator aimed to find out differences and similarities between the earliest and latest works and show the changes in the trends and expressive principles of these years.

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Maks Roosma grant for Maarja Mäemets, student of glass

For the year 2016/17 the annual grant for a glass student of the EAA goes to MAARJA MÄEMETS for her outstanding results in combining glass and photography in her creative work and for winning the first prize of the student art competition organized by Bild-Werk Frauenau, Germany.

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