Calendar

29.01.2019 — 24.03.2019

Misa Asanuma’s exhibition “enkei” at EKA Photograpy Showcase Gallery

From 29th of January, Misa Asanuma’s new exhibition “enkei” will be visible in photography department vitrine gallery. Misa Asanuma’s new exhibition “enkei ” throw doubt on our desire to take photography in this image-saturated era; Why we want to archive some scenery as images, and how we treat captured images after that? Why, time to time, we automatically do so, even we might not cherish them that much afterward?

The unique mismatch of materials framed in the showcase is her imagined landscape, which emerged from her personal experience.

Misa Asanuma (b.1994) is an artist from Japan. She studied literature at Meiji University, Tokyo. She is currently in the middle of her MA studies in the department of Contemporary Art of the Estonian Academy of Arts and mainly working on photography.

The exhibition will stay open until 24th of March at the address Põhja pst 35, in front of the Contemporary Art Museum of Estonia. The exhibition is open 24h/7 days.

showcase.visual(1).jpg
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Misa Asanuma’s exhibition “enkei” at EKA Photograpy Showcase Gallery

Tuesday 29 January, 2019 — Sunday 24 March, 2019

Photography

From 29th of January, Misa Asanuma’s new exhibition “enkei” will be visible in photography department vitrine gallery. Misa Asanuma’s new exhibition “enkei ” throw doubt on our desire to take photography in this image-saturated era; Why we want to archive some scenery as images, and how we treat captured images after that? Why, time to time, we automatically do so, even we might not cherish them that much afterward?

The unique mismatch of materials framed in the showcase is her imagined landscape, which emerged from her personal experience.

Misa Asanuma (b.1994) is an artist from Japan. She studied literature at Meiji University, Tokyo. She is currently in the middle of her MA studies in the department of Contemporary Art of the Estonian Academy of Arts and mainly working on photography.

The exhibition will stay open until 24th of March at the address Põhja pst 35, in front of the Contemporary Art Museum of Estonia. The exhibition is open 24h/7 days.

showcase.visual(1).jpg
Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

01.02.2019 — 31.03.2019

Taavi Suisalu’s light both ancient and new at Tallinn City Gallery

From 1 February the exhibition “Ocean Botlights” by Taavi Suisalu will be open at the Tallinn City Gallery. Suisalu, who tackles the relationship between people and technology, here explores light – simultaneously a giver of life and a conveyer of information, spreading out in a web of rays the breadth of a hair at the bottom of the oceans, where no other light can reach. The exhibition is curated by Siim Preiman.

The exhibition will open on Thursday, 31 January at 6pm and will remain open until 31 March.

Taavi Suisalu (b. 1982) is an artist, who seems to be constantly flickering between different times, simultaneously looking into the ancient past and the future just out of reach. It seems that this tension between eras is an activating force in his work. At the exhibition “Ocean Botlights”, light is what brings together the ancient and the modern, simultaneously one of the prerequisites for life on Earth as well as the conveyer of information along the super-fast fibre optic cables that cover the world like a spider’s web.

“Light is not just a condition necessary for life, but the infrastructure of our information society also relies on it – the internet relies in large part on the relay of information in the form of light along fibre optic cables. Along with productivity, cheapness and user-friendliness, the internet has helped the mass growth of information and communication technology (ICT) in society. As a result, almost all important products and services in first-world countries depend on ICTs,” Oliver Laas writes in the accompanying booklet.

The installations on show at the exhibition bring together the characteristics of light both ancient and new. Suisalu seems to be trying to capture continuity in his work and is searching for something with a longer perspective. “Although how people behave and think acclimatises to new technologies quickly, the changes in sensations, physiology and mentality are more long-term,” he writes in the accompanying text. It seems that Suisalu is striving towards such a level of standardisation that would allow us to overcome the seemingly accelerating and unstoppable fervour for technological development.

Taavi Suisalu activates peripheral areas using technology, sound and performance based art as tools for an intriguing coming together. His work is inspired by the way contemporary society relates to technology and its influence on how a social being behaves, senses and thinks. In his work, he also connects cultural phenomena with contemporary cultural practices and approaches that are more traditional. His recent solo-exhibitions include “Landscapes and Portraits” (Hobusepea Gallery, 2017) and “I Am NOT Sitting in a Room” (Draakoni Gallery, 2015).

We would like to thank: Estonian Cultural Endowment, Estonian Ministry of Culture, Estonian Artists’ Association, Veinisõber, AkzoNobel, WRO Art Center, EMAP / EMARE, Creative Europe, Tartu Valgus, KOOR Wood, Kadri Toom, Indrek Tali, Mihkel Säre, Tõnu Narro, John Grzinich

Tallinn City Gallery (Harju 13) is open Wednesday till Sunday 12–7pm. Entrance is free.

Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

Taavi Suisalu’s light both ancient and new at Tallinn City Gallery

Friday 01 February, 2019 — Sunday 31 March, 2019

From 1 February the exhibition “Ocean Botlights” by Taavi Suisalu will be open at the Tallinn City Gallery. Suisalu, who tackles the relationship between people and technology, here explores light – simultaneously a giver of life and a conveyer of information, spreading out in a web of rays the breadth of a hair at the bottom of the oceans, where no other light can reach. The exhibition is curated by Siim Preiman.

The exhibition will open on Thursday, 31 January at 6pm and will remain open until 31 March.

Taavi Suisalu (b. 1982) is an artist, who seems to be constantly flickering between different times, simultaneously looking into the ancient past and the future just out of reach. It seems that this tension between eras is an activating force in his work. At the exhibition “Ocean Botlights”, light is what brings together the ancient and the modern, simultaneously one of the prerequisites for life on Earth as well as the conveyer of information along the super-fast fibre optic cables that cover the world like a spider’s web.

“Light is not just a condition necessary for life, but the infrastructure of our information society also relies on it – the internet relies in large part on the relay of information in the form of light along fibre optic cables. Along with productivity, cheapness and user-friendliness, the internet has helped the mass growth of information and communication technology (ICT) in society. As a result, almost all important products and services in first-world countries depend on ICTs,” Oliver Laas writes in the accompanying booklet.

The installations on show at the exhibition bring together the characteristics of light both ancient and new. Suisalu seems to be trying to capture continuity in his work and is searching for something with a longer perspective. “Although how people behave and think acclimatises to new technologies quickly, the changes in sensations, physiology and mentality are more long-term,” he writes in the accompanying text. It seems that Suisalu is striving towards such a level of standardisation that would allow us to overcome the seemingly accelerating and unstoppable fervour for technological development.

Taavi Suisalu activates peripheral areas using technology, sound and performance based art as tools for an intriguing coming together. His work is inspired by the way contemporary society relates to technology and its influence on how a social being behaves, senses and thinks. In his work, he also connects cultural phenomena with contemporary cultural practices and approaches that are more traditional. His recent solo-exhibitions include “Landscapes and Portraits” (Hobusepea Gallery, 2017) and “I Am NOT Sitting in a Room” (Draakoni Gallery, 2015).

We would like to thank: Estonian Cultural Endowment, Estonian Ministry of Culture, Estonian Artists’ Association, Veinisõber, AkzoNobel, WRO Art Center, EMAP / EMARE, Creative Europe, Tartu Valgus, KOOR Wood, Kadri Toom, Indrek Tali, Mihkel Säre, Tõnu Narro, John Grzinich

Tallinn City Gallery (Harju 13) is open Wednesday till Sunday 12–7pm. Entrance is free.

Posted by Kunstiakadeemia — Permalink

21.02.2019 — 21.03.2019

“Weak Monument” by Laura Linsi, Roland Reemaa and Tadeáš Říha

The opening of the exhibition Weak Monument will take place on February 21st at 8PM. The opening is preceded by Välkloeng at 6PM, moderated by Laura Linsi and Roland Reemaa.

Weak Monument was the Estonian national pavilion at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia. It was located in the deconsecrated church of Santa Maria Ausiliatrice. The exhibition at the EAA Gallery looks back at the site-specific spatial installation through photographer Hampus Berndtson’s photos and introduces the project through spatial fragments, models and the book Weak Monument: Architectures Beyond the Plinth.

 Weak Monument turns its focus from the traditional culture of monuments to space that is implicitly and concealedly political. Instead of explicit meanings inscribed in marble and bronze, what charges the public might lie elsewhere. How does space represent power? Imagine a spectrum between the triumphal column and revolutionary barricade and extend it – sometimes it is the underlying pavement which is the true representation of collective agency. Weak Monument is an oxymoron – a rhetorical device which can offer fresh perspectives on how to recognise the political in any built form.

In conjunction with the pavilion, the book Weak Monument – Architectures Beyond the Plinth edited by the curators Laura Linsi, Roland Reemaa and Tadeas Riha was published by Park Books (Zürich, 2018). The book includes essays by authors such as Tom Avermaete, Eik Hermann, Klaus Platzgummer and Margrethe Troensegaard, and presents a collection of weak monuments through paintings, personal photos and drawings as well as archive material from Estonian and European museums.

 

Posted by Pire Sova — Permalink

“Weak Monument” by Laura Linsi, Roland Reemaa and Tadeáš Říha

Thursday 21 February, 2019 — Thursday 21 March, 2019

Gallery

The opening of the exhibition Weak Monument will take place on February 21st at 8PM. The opening is preceded by Välkloeng at 6PM, moderated by Laura Linsi and Roland Reemaa.

Weak Monument was the Estonian national pavilion at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia. It was located in the deconsecrated church of Santa Maria Ausiliatrice. The exhibition at the EAA Gallery looks back at the site-specific spatial installation through photographer Hampus Berndtson’s photos and introduces the project through spatial fragments, models and the book Weak Monument: Architectures Beyond the Plinth.

 Weak Monument turns its focus from the traditional culture of monuments to space that is implicitly and concealedly political. Instead of explicit meanings inscribed in marble and bronze, what charges the public might lie elsewhere. How does space represent power? Imagine a spectrum between the triumphal column and revolutionary barricade and extend it – sometimes it is the underlying pavement which is the true representation of collective agency. Weak Monument is an oxymoron – a rhetorical device which can offer fresh perspectives on how to recognise the political in any built form.

In conjunction with the pavilion, the book Weak Monument – Architectures Beyond the Plinth edited by the curators Laura Linsi, Roland Reemaa and Tadeas Riha was published by Park Books (Zürich, 2018). The book includes essays by authors such as Tom Avermaete, Eik Hermann, Klaus Platzgummer and Margrethe Troensegaard, and presents a collection of weak monuments through paintings, personal photos and drawings as well as archive material from Estonian and European museums.

 

Posted by Pire Sova — Permalink